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$(document).ready(function(){
    $(document).bind('keydown',function(e){
        key  = e.keyCode;
        if(key == 37){
            left();
        }else if(key == 38){
            up();
        }else if(key == 39){
            right();
        }else if(key == 40){
            down();
        }
    });
            alert("Hi");
});

"Hi" only alerts once how can i break out of a $(document).bind after its started? Something like break; or return; maybe?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you expecting it to alert more than once? It will alert one time when the DOM is ready, that's it. It has nothing to do with the keydown event. –  elclanrs Feb 21 '13 at 4:18
    
I don't understand your question. Both break and return are valid javascript commands. –  Barney Feb 21 '13 at 4:18
    
What are you trying to do? "hi" alerts once because $(document).ready() fires once when the document dom is loaded and ready. Maybe you wanted to put the alert inside the keydown event handler? –  deadlock Feb 21 '13 at 4:21
    
You can exit a function at any time with a return statement. You can exit a loop with a break statement. –  jahroy Feb 21 '13 at 4:22

2 Answers 2

"Hi" only alerts once because it is not within the keydown handler... it's within the ready handler.

$(document).ready(function(){
    $(document).bind('keydown',function(e){
        key  = e.keyCode;
        if(key == 37){
            left();
        }else if(key == 38){
            up();
        }else if(key == 39){
            right();
        }else if(key == 40){
            down();
        }
    });// keydown handler ends here
            alert("Hi");
});

Also as a side note, try using the console methods instead of alert(), as it can be more descriptive and it's non-blocking.

UPDATE

I can see from the below comments you're quite confused as to what's actually happening in your code... So let's step through it.

$(document).ready(function(){

Here you're binding a handler to the DOM ready event. This gets fired when the browser has finished building the document structure. It doesn't take in to consideration any external assets that need to be loaded.

$(document).bind('keydown', function(e){

Now we're binding a handler to the keydown event. Anything within the function (and only within the function) will be executed when the keydown event bubbles up to document level.

key = e.keyCode;

You assign the keyCode property of the event to a key variable. I suggest preceeding it with the keyword var, to maintain scope. var key = e.keyCode;

if(key == 37){
    left();
}else if(key == 38){
    up();
}else if(key == 39){
    right();
}else if(key == 40){
     down();
}

Now you're jumping through a series of if/else blocks, and calling left, up, right and down functions if the previously declared key variable matches one of your conditions.

});

This is the END of the keydown handler.

alert("Hi");

Here you alert() a message. This is done straight after the keydown handler is BOUND, but NOT after each or any execution of said handler. This line is executed ONCE, as part of the document ready handler.

});

This is the end of the document ready handler.

share|improve this answer
    
alright correction so im wondering how to get out of the keydown handler since it loops over and over checking for the keydowns but i want to break out of that and go to the alert again –  Caveman Feb 21 '13 at 4:22
2  
@Caveman - You are clearly confused. keydown doesn't loop, it executes every time a key is pressed down. Your current code will execute ONE TIME when the document is ready. It binds a keydown function to the document, but this event handler is never fired until the user presses a key. What exactly are you trying to do? –  jahroy Feb 21 '13 at 4:24
    
To continue on with what @jahroy is saying, the keydown handler will loop only when a key is pressed (and held). ONLY code within the handler is executed. –  ahren Feb 21 '13 at 4:26
    
hmm alright i think i understand but is there anyway to unbind the keydown handler? –  Caveman Feb 21 '13 at 4:27
    
sure is. .unbind(). api.jquery.com/unbind -- But if you're using jQuery 1.7+, I suggest just using .one() api.jquery.com/one for this purpose. –  ahren Feb 21 '13 at 4:38

I think, you dont want to use keydown for more than once.

You can either use on and off() like,

$(document).ready(function(){
    $(document).on('keydown',function(e){
        key  = e.keyCode;
        if(key == 37){
            left();
        }else if(key == 38){
            up();
        }else if(key == 39){
            right();
        }else if(key == 40){
            down();
        }
        $(document).off('keydown'); 
    });// keydown handler ends here
            alert("Hi");
});

Or you can use one() which fires only once.

$(document).ready(function(){
        $(document).one('keydown',function(e){
            key  = e.keyCode;
            if(key == 37){
                left();
            }else if(key == 38){
                up();
            }else if(key == 39){
                right();
            }else if(key == 40){
                down();
            }  
        });// keydown handler ends here
                alert("Hi");
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Non-sensical when there is such a method already. .one() –  ahren Feb 21 '13 at 4:39
    
You should have waited for edit :) . May be he would want to run for more than 1 time or off on certain condition. –  Jashwant Feb 21 '13 at 4:40

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