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A control is accessed by two worker threads, the 2nd before the first has completed it's work on the control. The second thread (9) gets InvokeRequired == false, and the first thread (17) then gets the exception when calling .Refresh on a child-control.

Is this expected behavior? What exactly causes a thread to see a control's InvokeRequired as true/false?
And finally, what would be a good solution.. Put a lock on all invoke statements, and make them call a separate method instead (to avoid deadlock obviously) ?

private void OnHistoryUpdate(object sender)
{
    Console.WriteLine("<< Invoke? " + this.InvokeRequired   + " " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId );

    if (this.InvokeRequired)
        this.Invoke(new Action<object>(OnHistoryUpdate), sender);  

    LoadTimeSeries(this.Interval);
    Console.WriteLine(">> Invoke? " + this.InvokeRequired   + " " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

}

output:

<< Invoke? True Thread: 17
<< Invoke? False Thread:  9
>> Invoke? False Thread:  9
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1  
You forgot the else statement. –  Hans Passant Feb 21 '13 at 4:26
    
What exception are you getting? –  zespri Feb 21 '13 at 4:26
    
"A control is accessed by two worker threads" well that's 2 problems just there. Worker threads should never access controls, even to read from them. –  Marc Gravell Feb 21 '13 at 5:08
    
@MarcGravell, really? I receive fast streaming socket data which requires updates of a number of controls. What alternative way to update are you suggesting? Or maybe it's wrong to call them worker threads, idk. They are created from socket messages. –  bretddog Feb 21 '13 at 7:01
    
Worker threads is right, even if your code doesn't create them explicitly; sounds like a socket message is received on a non-UI thread. Then code handling a socket message executes on a non-UI thread and must marshal to the UI thread to access the UI controls. The InvokeRequired technique is commonly used but worker thread and UI thread must share code; it's hard to maintain Separation of concerns. Better to supply the UI with socket data, say via an event, letting it update itself. Then worker is not responsible for UI and vice versa. –  groverboy Feb 23 '13 at 1:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code updates the control twice:

  • Using the call to Invoke, which delegates another call to OnHistoryUpdate. This is safe because Invoke marshals execution to the UI thread.
  • After the call to Invoke. Invoke executes synchronously and when it returns your code will call LoadTimeSeries a second time, this time unsafely (it doesn't check InvokeRequired again).

I would change the method as below, and also consider using BeginInvoke instead so the worker thread doesn't block.

private void OnHistoryUpdate(object sender)
{
    Console.WriteLine("<< Invoke? " + this.InvokeRequired   + " " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId );

    if (this.InvokeRequired)
        this.Invoke(new Action<object>(OnHistoryUpdate), sender);
    else  
        LoadTimeSeries(this.Interval);

    Console.WriteLine(">> Invoke? " + this.InvokeRequired   + " " + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);    
}
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ah! eh....... :/ –  bretddog Feb 21 '13 at 4:28

If you call Refresh on a control that requires invoke from you thread without using invoke it is expected to get an exception. Make sure that you do not do this and you'll be fine. This is all that is needed.

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