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Let me give you an example:

public class MyClass
{
    public string MyProperty { get; set; }

    public MyClass(string myProperty)
    {
        MyProperty = myProperty; // bad?
        this.MyProperty = myProperty; // good?
    }
}

I've taken to using this in this scenario, because I have minor paranoia that relying on case alone might be confusing or worse might actually lead to bugs.

What is the "best practice" here?

EDIT:

So far, it sounds like this is a lot more subjective than I thought. I figured people would come down strongly on one side or the other.

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StyleCop "strongly encourages" the use of this. –  280Z28 Sep 30 '09 at 17:13
    
@280Z28, StyleCop always encourages the use of this, or only in cases where there is a local variable that differs by case alone? –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 17:18
    
I've been in shops that do both - remove it or mandate inclusion of it. Either way I don't feel very strongly about it :) –  womp Sep 30 '09 at 17:40
    
This smells like bad design. Why would you want to implement a property in a sub-class with the same name as a property on the outer class? Whats the use-case? –  roosteronacid Sep 30 '09 at 21:38
    
@roosteronacid, there's only one property here. The other one is a constructor argument. –  Pavel Minaev Sep 30 '09 at 21:44
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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Using "this." is redundant in any class. It's totally up to your development shop to set a standard for using it.

The pros of using "this." are that some developers find it easier to associate it in their mind with the class instance when they are reading the code, and as you mention, make it clearer when dealing with similarly named items.

The cons are that some people view it as cluttering up your code file and if you use tools like ReSharper, they mark it as redundant code by default.

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BTW - Resharper has options to force this, especially if you use something like StyleCop for Resharper. –  Reed Copsey Sep 30 '09 at 17:17
2  
"this" is not entirely redundant. If you have a local variable named "myThing" and an instance variable named "myThing", then "myThing" references the local variable, and "this.myThing" references the instance variable. –  Jim Mischel Sep 30 '09 at 17:17
1  
My recollection is that this.myVariable is recommended to avoid the use of Hungarian notation. In this case, this.myVariable is recommended over m_myVariable. –  Steve Guidi Sep 30 '09 at 17:25
    
@Steve Guidi...but probably not preferable to using just an underscore (as in _myVariable), which seems to be very common practice even though not officially endorsed by MS. –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 17:28
2  
I find "this" useful. I also use "base" and "NameOfClass" (for static variables). –  Jodi Sep 30 '09 at 21:33
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As womp said. "this" is redundant but it makes the code easier to read. Or rather harder to misread.

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C# is definately case sensitive so there is no risk in using...

MyProperty = myProperty;

So then I would look to other best practices like writing the least amount of code needed to achieve your goal (while being self documenting). The truth is, it's not required, minimalists might say leave it out.

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Here's how I currently initialize properties using your example (both auto-implemented and not)

        public class MyClass
    {
        public string MyProperty { get; set; }

        public string AnotherProperty
        {
            get { return _anotherProperty; }
            set { _anotherProperty = value; }
        }
        private string _anotherProperty;

        public MyClass(string myProperty, string anotherProperty)
        {
            MyProperty = myProperty; // auto-implemented property initialization
            _anotherProperty = anotherProperty; //property with member variable initialization                
        }
    }

Dotting in using 'this' is over specification to me. I know that it's a local property because it is capitalized. All properties should be capialized. I know that the variable '_anotherProperty' has class scope because of the underscore. I used to omit the underscore from class-level variables. Code is easier for me to read when the underscore is there because I immediately know the scope without having to mouse over the variable to see the declaration in the tooltip from VS. Also, I get the benefit of using the same name for local variables by just omitting the underscore. This makes your initializations look clean. Another benefit of the underscore is that you can type an underscore and press ctrl+space and all of your class-scoped variables are grouped.

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Thanks, I like your explanation. I definitely use an underscore for backing fields for exactly the reasons you mention. And I never use the this keyword unless there is a local variable in the same scope with the same name and different case. –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 22:10
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At my workplace, coding standards dictate that properties be written LikeThis while local variables be written likeThis. As C# is case sensitive, this is a good tool to utilize to distinguish your variables apart. If, however, you find yourself with a property and local variable with the exact same name, using the this keyword will definitely disambiguate the usage.

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Both of your options rely on case alone.... There is no difference between either.

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Sure there is. One has 5 extra characters that are read by whoever is viewing the code, which may help or hinder the reader's comprehension. –  Brian Sep 30 '09 at 17:13
1  
Wait, but wouldn't it actually fail to say MyProperty = this.myProperty?. In other words, doesn't this. guarantee that what comes after it is a class-level property or variable? If yes, how can you say the only difference is case? –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 17:16
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In my opinion, the "best practice" here is, "don't do that." If I run across that in code I'm reviewing, I immediately flag it. Having two variables that differ only by case is a misunderstanding just waiting to happen. It's just too easy for a maintenance programmer to come along months or years later and inadvertently make an assigment to myThing instead of MyThing.

Added later:

A commenter asked for my suggestion to replace the upper/lower case naming convention. For that I need a concrete example. Say you have a simple Book class that has only one property: Title:

public class Book
{
    public string Title { get; private set; }
}

Now you need a constructor. A common convention is to use a lowercase version of the property:

public Book(string title)
{
    Title = title;
}

Or, if you want to make sure there's no ambiguity: this.Title = title.

One can make the argument that this is okay in constructors. And it might be, if all constructors were so simple. But my experience has been that when a constructor goes beyond just a few lines, the distinction between Title and title gets lost. The problem becomes worse when you're talking about methods other than constructors. Either way, you need a different convention.

What to use? I've variously used and seen used abbreviations in the parameters: ttl, for example. Or something like bookTitle, which is more descriptive when using Intellisense. In my opinion, either is preferable to the convention of using a name that differs only by case.

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Do you have a naming convention that avoids this problem? I hate to start naming all my locals localMyThing. It's basically Hungarian notation. –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 17:36
    
It's trivial to set up StyleCop so that any references to properties (and fields) must be qualified by this, which renders the "too easy to inadvertently assign the wrong thing" argument moot. –  Pavel Minaev Sep 30 '09 at 21:47
    
@Jim, thanks for clarifying. I like bookTitle. –  devuxer Sep 30 '09 at 22:21
    
@Pavel: sure, it's trivial to set up StyleCop to do that. If you don't think that forcing the use of "this" is an unreasonable burden. If you do that, you might as well also force full specification on all references. That is, no more Thread.Sleep(10), but rather System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(10). Also: it's equally trivial for a programmer to skip using StyleCop. When you use them, tools like StyleCop are great for enforcing conventions. But they're too easy to circumvent. –  Jim Mischel Oct 1 '09 at 17:39
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