Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a date string of the format 2012-12-20T01:16:02.05 and i want to convert to the format 2011-12-20-01.16.02.050000

Currently i am doing it as follows

format = "%F-%H.%M.%S.%N"
split(stringinput,input,"T"); 
split(input[1],date,"-")
split(input[2],time,":")

 return strftime(format,mktime(date[1] " " date[2] " " date[3] " " time[1] " " time[2] " " time[3] " " time[4]));

But i am losing the microsecond information or the millisecond information. How can i get that. It is returning 2011-12-20-01.16.02.%N

Also any suggestions to make the string parsing more generic. Currently it support only one format.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Why are you using mktime()? The change you describe is just a text change:

$ echo "2012-12-20T01:16:02.05" | awk '{sub(/T/,"-"); gsub(/:/,"."); print $0 "0000"}'
2012-12-20-01.16.02.050000

I'm assuming it was just a typo when you changed 2012 to 2011 in your output.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for suggesting use of simpler approach. –  jaypal Jun 16 '13 at 6:21

You will need to treat the millisecond data separately. Also, use gensub() to format your string information. Run like:

awk -f script.awk

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {

    string = "2012-12-20T01:16:02.05"

    groups = "^(....)-(..)-(..).(..):(..):(..).*"
    format = "\\1 \\2 \\3 \\4 \\5 \\6"

    datespec = gensub(groups, format, "", string)
    timestamp = mktime(datespec)


    newstring = strftime("%F-%H.%M.%S", timestamp)

    sub(/.*\./,"",string)

    printf "%s.%s0000\n", newstring, string
}

Results:

2012-12-20-01.16.02.050000

EDIT:

BEGIN {

    string = "2011-01-10T14:45:13.815-05:00"

    groups = "^(....)-(..)-(..).(..):(..):(..).*"
    format = "\\1 \\2 \\3 \\4 \\5 \\6"

    datespec = gensub(groups, format, "", string)
    timestamp = mktime(datespec)


    sub(/.*\./,"",string)

    offset = substr(string,4)

    split(offset,array,":")

    seconds = (array[1] * 60 * 60) + (array[2] * 60)

    newstring = strftime("%F-%H.%M.%S", timestamp - seconds, 1)

    printf "%s.%s00\n", newstring, substr(string,0,3)
}

Results:

2011-01-10-09.45.13.81500
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Steve, Thanks it works. But will you be able to suggest me how can i make it generic to handle input in any format. –  Priya Ranjan Feb 21 '13 at 9:34
    
@PriyaRanjan: In any format? That would be difficult. You could probably test a couple of different regexps using a loop. Then break the loop if mktime() doesn't return -1. If you list a few different datetime formats perhaps I could show you how exactly. –  Steve Feb 21 '13 at 10:46
    
I have gone through the list and it seems that the formats that i have are of the above format with the addition of time zone information. –  Priya Ranjan Feb 22 '13 at 7:29
    
@PriyaRanjan: Would you be able to paste that data into your question? Expected output would be very helpful too. –  Steve Feb 22 '13 at 7:32
    
I have gone through the list and it seems that the formats that i have are of the above format with the addition of time zone information like 2011-01-10T14:45:13.815-05:00 . Here the timezone is UTC-05:00 . Can you please suggest me how to handle this. I read through the mktime specification and it appears that it does not handle timezones . –  Priya Ranjan Feb 22 '13 at 7:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.