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I have a question about combining java with javascript. In our application we have gui build in javascript and server side build in java. In javascript we write that we want to call methodX from classY in java. The problem is that java doesen't know anything about javascript so when we change something in java we could break javascript code. Even plain refactor option in eclipse can break our javascript without knowing (changing method name, removing params, renaming setter and getter in DTO object). The question is how to counteract against it. I was thinking about writing some annotations in java so after changing method signature you will get compilation error (is it even possible to write this kind of annotation) but I don't want to reinvent the wheel again if there is some kind of tool which will do it for me. I would be grateful for any help.

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Changing your signature in JAVA cannot refactor your JavaScript code. Because JavaScript just invoke Java method (as a service). You need to manually change them. Imagine Java methods are created by third party and you are trying to consume their service using JavaScript. So if they change their signature you need to modify. Or what you can do, overload the methods if the previous methods are required/ or consumed by JavaScript –  asifsid88 Feb 21 '13 at 7:21
    
I know that changing java doesn't change javascript. I want something that will show compilation error when someone tries to change method(class) signature in java (for example compared to some signature defined in annotation or somewhere else) so he will see that something is wrong. Now we know that something is wrong when we run javascript function. In java everything is ok. –  user1307657 Feb 21 '13 at 10:28
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The question is how to counteract against it.

Probably the most practical solution is to develop a set of automated tests (e.g. unit or system tests) that are specifically designed to "exercise" all of the cases where there is a Java API that is called from Javascript (or vice-versa)

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I though about it and if no one knows any better way we probably use it. –  user1307657 Feb 21 '13 at 10:29
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I think there are a couple of solutions(workarounds) for your problem.

1)Mapping certain strings with methods.

public class JavascriptCallable {

private static final String jsIdentifierMethod1 = "method1";

private static final String jsIdentifierMethod2 = "method2";


/**
 * All requests from JS should be redirected to this method.
 * 
 * @param methodName Name of the method
 */
public void requestFromJavascript (String methodName) throws Exception {

    if (methodName.equals(jsIdentifierMethod1)){
        method1();
    } else if (methodName.equals(jsIdentifierMethod2)){
        method2();
    } else{
        throw new Exception("Method not supported");
    }

}

public void method1(){
    // Do something
}

public void method2() {
    // Do something
}

}

2)Having separate methods eligible for js calling. This will help if you are using reflections to call the methods

public class JavascriptCallable {

/*----------------Methods to be called by js. Never refractor------------------*/

public void noRefractorMethod1() {
    method1();
}

public void noRefractorMethod2() {
    method2();
}

/*-------------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

/*---------Methods with business logic. Refractoring these will not mess your js-----------*/

public void method1() {
    // Business logic
}

public void method2() {
    // Business logic
}

/*-------------------------------------------------------------------------------*/

}

Please let me know if this helps.

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First workaround would be time consuming in our project and I don't like if-else sequence. The second option isn't good also. You write methods which are protected from refactoring only by comments so if someone don't see it he will change them anyway. For now automatic tests are the best solution I think. –  user1307657 Feb 25 '13 at 12:45
    
I didn't like the second option either. However if you notice it carefully all the methods eligible to be called from javascript starts with noRefractor. So one will the method name before refractoring. However I am not proud of this kind of solution. I will not defend the solution at all. By time consuming if you meant time consuming to execute, please explain how. I agree with if else sequence being a bad way of coding. I will think of an alternative (if possible for me) to avoid if else. –  Bikash Rath Feb 25 '13 at 14:44
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