Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a simple table ->

id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY
by_id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL
posted_on INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL

My table engine is MyISAM.

I have a multiple column index called combo1 on by_id,posted_on,id

I run this query ->

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM books 
        WHERE by_id = '1' AND posted_on = '0' 
        ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 7;

The Extra column says Using where and key column says combo1

But, when i run this query ->

EXPLAIN SELECT * FROM books 
        WHERE by_id IN(1,7,10) AND posted_on = '0' 
        ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 7;

The Extra column says Using where; Using filesort and key column says combo1.

Why is a filesort occuring in second case even though the QEP shows that optimizer is using the index combo1 which has 'id' indexed in it.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The index is a B+ tree. That means that under the by_id 1 there are all records with posted_on 0 and by_id 1, and then you have all the ids for those records. Under the by_id 7 however you have another tree branch, that contains records with posted_on 0 and they contains the records with their ids.

When you have in clause, you are retrieving 3 different branches of the tree, you have to merge them and resort them, since ids with 1,2,4 may be under by_id 1, but 3,5 under by_id 10; MySQL retrieves 1,2,4,3,5 and have to resort them.

In the first case there is only one branch, and each branch is already sorted

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks great explanation @Darhazer –  Ray Z Feb 21 '13 at 7:38
    
please tell if i should then remove id from combo1 index.. @Darhazer –  Ray Z Feb 21 '13 at 7:44
    
Well, I'm not sure if MySQL takes advantage that the branches are already ordered and applies merge_sort or not; maybe it depends on the version as well. Without proper benchmarking, I would preserve id in the index. On the other hand, if the table was InnoDB, id is included at the end of every secondary index. This is taken into account in sorting only in MySQL 5.6, if I remember correctly. –  Darhazer Feb 21 '13 at 7:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.