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In the book Secrets of the JavaScript Ninja, p. 43 - 46, it has some code like:

function assert(flag, msg) {
    if (!flag) {
        console.log("Assertion failed for: " + msg);
    }
}

function outer() {
    var a = 1;

    function inner() { }

    assert(typeof b === "number", "b is in scope");
    var b = 1;
}

outer();

And the conclusion is, since the assertion failed, that "b is not in scope yet, until it is declared". But I am thinking it is otherwise, because first of all, b can be having a local scope already, but just that it is not a "number" yet. b in fact is already a local scope b, and will shadow any global b.

For example:

var b = 123;

function foo() {
    b = 456;

    var b = 789;
}

foo();

console.log(b);   // prints out 123

since it prints out 123, so we can see that when the line b = 456; is executed, b is already a local scope b. (even though before the assignment it is uninitialized yet).

Also, we can print it out instead of assigning to b:

var b = 123;

function foo() {
    console.log(b);  // prints out undefined

    var b = 789;
}

foo();

console.log(b);     // prints out 123

so again, we can see that the first print out is not 123 but is undefined, meaning the b is a local scope b, and therefore, b really is already in scope in the book's example.

Is the above description and concept correct?

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The var b is hoisted to the top of the function's scope, so b later on in the function refers to the local b, regardless of the order. –  Blender Feb 21 '13 at 8:06
    
so the book's description is wrong? And what do you mean "top of the function's scope"? (the scope is the scope, there is no top or bottom of the scope). You mean "hoisted to the top of the function (as if it is the first line, and is in the function's local scope, regardless of where it appears inside the function"? –  動靜能量 Feb 21 '13 at 8:08
1  
I dislike the term "hoisting", it infers declarations are moved to the top of something, which that isn't what actually happens. The standard explains it as all declarations being processed before any code is executed, so that's how you should think of it too. Effects on scope are side effects. –  RobG Feb 21 '13 at 8:25
    
but isn't the "final effect" exactly the same as "hoisting"? (even though it is not what actually happened). And that's why some programmers would "manually hoist all of them to the beginning of the function content", so that there is no confusion. –  動靜能量 Feb 21 '13 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

Regarding the code:

assert(typeof b === "number", "b is in scope");
var b = 1;

The statement:

"b is not in scope yet, until it is declared"

is wrong. b is 'in scope' (because it's declared, it's created before any code is executed) but has not yet been assigned a value, so typeof b returns undefined and the test fails.

Is the above description and concept correct?

Yes, more or less. A simpler proof is:

function foo() {
  alert(b);
  var b = 5;
}

function bar() {
  alert(x);
  x = 5;
}

foo() // 'undefined' since b is "in scope" but hasn't been assigned a value yet

bar() // throws an error since x isn't "in scope" until the following line.
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what do you mean "more or less"?? If some point is incorrect, could you pls point it out? –  動靜能量 Feb 21 '13 at 9:24
    
I said “more –or–less” because "in scope" is jargon. Strictly, declaring a local variable creates a property of the local execution object before any code is executed. Identifier resolution will find that “local” property (variable) and not search further on the scope chain. Not mentioned is that the global b doesn’t exist until the code assigning to it causes it to be created. Lastly, once created as a global, it’s “in scope” for every execution context created from the same global context, even though it might be “shadowed” by variables in other parts of the scope chain with the same name. –  RobG Feb 21 '13 at 23:26

Indeed, the book's conclusion is wrong. var b anywhere inside a function means b exists anywhere inside the function. That's what "hoisting" is. All var and function declarations are hoisted to the top, regardless of where they occur in the scope. The value has simply not been assigned yet.

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