Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a client-server tile-based game. Client holds data in 3-dimensional std::vector and in each frame it compares it's content with the one that server sends (I have a separate std::vector at the client side which is filled with data sent by server).

Now the map at the client side consists of 15x11 tiles, each of which holds data about 10 objects placed on it, so I get 15*11*10 = 1650 elements in a std::vector.

I'm comparing data in both std::vectors and if something changed, I create new object / remove object / move object, depending on what are the differences. This is how I do it:

std::vector<IdAndPosition> clientIds; 
std::vector<IdAndPosition> serverIds;

// Fill client ids
for(unsigned int i = 0; i < m_tiles.size(); i++)
{
    for(unsigned int j = 0; j < m_tiles[i].size(); j++)
    {   
        for(unsigned int s = 0; s < m_tiles[i][j].getObjects().size(); s++)
        {
            clientIds.push_back(IdAndPosition(m_tiles[i][j].getObjectAtPosition(s)->getId(), i, j, s));
        }
    }
}

// Fill server ids
for(unsigned int i = 0; i < g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects.size(); i++)
{
    for(unsigned int j = 0; j < g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects[i].size(); j++)
    {   
        for(unsigned int s = 0; s < g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects[i][j].size(); s++)
        {
            serverIds.push_back(IdAndPosition(g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects[i][j][s].second, i, j, s));
        }
    }
}

for (int i = 0; i < serverIds.size(); i++)
{
    IdAndPosition& serverId = serverIds[i];

    bool found = false;
    for(int j = 0; j < clientIds.size(); j++)
    {
        IdAndPosition& clientId = clientIds[j];

        found = serverId.id == clientId.id;
        if(found)
            break;
    }
    if(!found)
    {
        // If not found, create that object
                        // tileX        // tileY
        m_tiles[serverId.pos[0]][serverId.pos[1]].addObjectAtPosition(
            TGameObjectFactory::createGameObject(g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects[serverId.pos[0]][serverId.pos[1]][serverId.pos[2]].first),   // Game object
            serverId.pos[2]                                                                                                                 // Position at stack
        );

        // And set it's individual id
        m_tiles[serverId.pos[0]][serverId.pos[1]].getObjectAtPosition(serverId.pos[2])->setId(g_gameStateData.m_gameObjects[serverId.pos[0]][serverId.pos[1]][serverId.pos[2]].second);
    }
}

for (int i = 0; i < clientIds.size(); i++)
{
    IdAndPosition& clientId = clientIds[i];

    bool found = false;
    for(int j = 0; j < serverIds.size(); j++)
    {
        IdAndPosition& serverId = serverIds[j];

        found = serverId.id == clientId.id;
        if(found)
            break;
    }
    if(!found)
    {
        // If not found, create empty object at this position
                        // tileX        // tileY
        m_tiles[clientId.pos[0]][clientId.pos[1]].addObjectAtPosition(
            TGameObjectFactory::createGameObject(NO_GAME_OBJECT_ID),        // Empty game object (we're removing deprecated one)
            clientId.pos[2]                                                 // Position at stack
        );
    }
}

The problem is that I get a big performance drop due to calling that function (from ~90 to ~20 fps) in debug mode. I know that's quite a big amount of data to go through each frame, but I have no idea how I could design it so that it's not that slow.

I used Performance Analysis in Visual Studio 2012 in order to find out what exactly causes the biggest performance drops, and I got that result: enter image description here

So it looks like [] operator for std::vector is the main reason.

share|improve this question
    
There is bounds checking in the debug version of [] (in my MSVC++) which is removed in release, this might be why it is relatively so high.. –  Karthik T Feb 21 '13 at 9:58
1  
It is also advisable to use iterators instead of indexes and operator[], especially when iterating over entire vectors. That addition at the bottom of operator[] is usually a multiply and an add. While the compiler may optimise operator[] away, there are no guarantees. –  user420442 Feb 21 '13 at 11:21
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is bounds checking in the debug version of [] (in my MSVC++) which is removed in release, this might be why it is relatively so high..

This is the code I see.

const_reference operator[](size_type _Pos) const
        {   // subscript nonmutable sequence
 #if _ITERATOR_DEBUG_LEVEL == 2
        if (size() <= _Pos)
            {   // report error
            _DEBUG_ERROR("vector subscript out of range");
            _SCL_SECURE_OUT_OF_RANGE;
            }

 #elif _ITERATOR_DEBUG_LEVEL == 1
        _SCL_SECURE_VALIDATE_RANGE(_Pos < size()); 
 #endif /* _ITERATOR_DEBUG_LEVEL */

        return (*(this->_Myfirst + _Pos));
        }

Pretty much every line is gone in release except the last..

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that indeed solved a problem. In release mode I got almost 250 fps. –  Piotr Chojnacki Feb 21 '13 at 10:19
add comment

The code you are doing performance analysis on, looks like it's doing a linear O(n) search on every item, making that whole thing O(n^2).

I don't really understand what you're trying to achieve, but the reason is not because std::vector's operator is slow, it's because of the sheer number of times you're doing it.

I would suggest at first to place all of your clientIds in a map, which would reduce the order to O(nlogn). There may be other optimisations to make too, for example not looking through every element in the outer map if you can help it.

for(int j = 0; j < serverIds.size(); j++)
{
    IdAndPosition& serverId = serverIds[j];

    found = serverId.id == clientId.id;
    if(found)
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Question seems to be about disparity betw release and debug I think, more than the performance itself –  Karthik T Feb 21 '13 at 10:01
1  
Still, this is definitely the first thing he should fix - brute force searching is not the way to go. –  Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 10:04
1  
A potentially faster alternative to a map would be to use sorted lists and zip em up; this avoids most dynamic memory allocation. –  Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 10:05
1  
@EamonNerbonne Im not arguing that, server should just send some sort of delta, instead of having to check, or something like that. –  Karthik T Feb 21 '13 at 10:06
    
sure; and he certainly shouldn't be flattening his list of id's and then searching through them - he's got a nice grid to use for lookups already in place! –  Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 10:09
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.