Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what is the correct way :

def my_func():
  return {'key1': val1, 'key2': val2}

or

def my_func():
  return
  {
    'key1': val1, 
    'key2': val2
  }

The second way seems more readable (especially when there is a lot of keys values, or nested objects) but I'm not sure the blank after return will work in every case

edit:

After some answers, I would suggest this :

def my_func():
  return {'key1': val1, 
          'key2': val2}

which seems to be the most consistent

share|improve this question
    
There is no single correct way. I recommend using the most readable option. But apart from that, whatever works for you is fine... –  Syjin Feb 21 '13 at 10:05
2  
This has nothing to do with JSON; all I see is Python dictionaries being constructed. The second form returns None because the dictionary is defined on the next line, stand-alone and ignored. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 21 '13 at 10:07
    
@MartijnPieters yes i've edited the title –  tahir Feb 21 '13 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For short dictionaries, the first one is OK, the second one won't work as expected (returns None). For longer ones, I would prefer something like

def my_func():
    return {'key1': val1,
            'key2': val2,
            'key3': val3,
            'key4': val4,
           }
share|improve this answer
    
Why not start the contents of the dictionary/list/tuple from a newline? –  BasicWolf Feb 21 '13 at 12:00
    
@BasicWolf - because return alone in a line returns None ignoring what follows. –  eumiro Feb 21 '13 at 12:10
    
I mean return { \n <contents here> \n } –  BasicWolf Feb 21 '13 at 12:12
1  
@BasicWolf - why not. Let's compare the upvotes for our answers to see what the population thinks ;-) –  eumiro Feb 21 '13 at 12:24

I would recommend the same as @eumiro, but IMO starting the contents of a big dict/list/tuple from a newline makes the code a bit more readable:

def my_func():
    return {
        'key1': val1,
        'key2': val2,
        'key3': val3,
        'key4': val4,
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
I would say there are more aesthetically appealing alternatives :) –  root Feb 21 '13 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.