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I have a question about grep. I am looking for a specific pattern within multiple lines of text. There are often multiple matches on the same line. I have worked out how to extract my pattern, but grep puts each match on a new line. Is there any way to stop grep doing this? Ideally I am hoping to extract all matches and retain the line structure of the original file.

Here is an example:

One input line (of which there are many thousands):

MUC3A|ENST00000414964[in] MUC3A|ENST00000422757[in] MUC3A|ENST00000319509[in] MUC3A|ENST00000483133[in] RP11-395B7.2.1|ENST00000420080[me] RP11-395B7.2.1|ENST00000438198[me] RP11-395B7.2.1|ENST00000434775[5g] MUC12|ENST00000536621[5g] MUC12|ENST00000379442[5g] MUC3A|ENST00000480291[5g] 

My grep command:

grep -oe MUC12[\|A-Za-z0-9-]*\[[A-Za-z0-9]*\]

My current output:

MUC12|ENST00000536621[5g]
MUC12|ENST00000379442[5g]

My ideal output:

MUC12|ENST00000536621[5g] MUC12|ENST00000379442[5g]

Any ideas? i'd be very grateful for any insights anyone may be able to offer.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
$ awk '{
   s=""
   for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
      if ($i ~ /MUC12[\|A-Za-z0-9-]*\[[A-Za-z0-9]*\]/) {
         printf "%s%s",s,$i
         s=" "
      }
   }
   print ""
}' file
MUC12|ENST00000536621[5g] MUC12|ENST00000379442[5g]

I'd change your RE a bit though to anchor the expression, use character classes instead of explicit ranges for conciseness and portability, and look for 1-or-more characters (+) instead of allowing zero (*):

$ awk '{
   s=""
   for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
      if ($i ~ /^MUC12\|[[:alnum:]-]+\[[[:alnum:]]+\]$/) {
         printf "%s%s",s,$i
         s=" "
      }
   }
   print ""
}' file
MUC12|ENST00000536621[5g] MUC12|ENST00000379442[5g]

I also moved the "|" outside of the character list as it doesn't seem to belong in there from your posted sample input.

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Brilliant, thanks! –  user2094907 Feb 21 '13 at 13:25
    
@user2094907 - you're welcome. If/when you get an answer you accept, remember to click on the check mark next to it so people reading this know you got your answer. –  Ed Morton Feb 21 '13 at 13:29
    
Will do, thanks. –  user2094907 Feb 21 '13 at 13:38

When you set the -o flag, grep will print each match separately on a new line and there's no way to change this behavior. The simple fix involves getting grep to print out the line numbers for each match and then joining the consecutively-numbered lines. You can use awk to do this. Run like:

< file grep -one "MUC12[\|A-Za-z0-9-]*\[[A-Za-z0-9]*\]" | awk -f script.awk

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    FS=":"
}

$1 == y {
    sub(/[^:]:/,"")
    r = (r ? r OFS : "") $0
    next
}

x {
    print x, r
    r=""
}

{
    x=$0
    y=$1
    sub(/[^:]:/,"",x)
}

END {
    print x, r
}

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

< file grep -one "MUC12[\|A-Za-z0-9-]*\[[A-Za-z0-9]*\]" | awk -F ":" '$1 == y { sub(/[^:]:/,""); r = (r ? r OFS : "") $0; next } x { print x, r; r="" } { x=$0; y=$1; sub(/[^:]:/,"",x) } END { print x, r }'

The approach presented here could be applied to any regex supported by grep. Unlike the accepted answer, this approach won't fail for non-whitespace delimited regex - and that could be very important.

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