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I'm writing some C code for an embedded application, and I've run into a problem wherein a compare against an enumerated value is not being executed correctly. Take the following code snippet, for example:

typedef unsigned int UINT16;
typedef enum enum_items_tag
{
   ITEM_1,
   ITEM_2,
   ITEM_3,

   /* ... */

   ITEM_918,
   MAX_ENUM_ITEMS
} enum_items_t;

UINT16 n;

for ( n = 0; n < MAX_ENUM_ITEMS; n++ )
{
   // Do something
}

The code executes as expected, until n is incremented to equal MAX_ENUM_ITEMS, at which time the compare fails, and execution continues within the loop (when it should have exited). I've done things like this in the past without any problems.

I've tried re-typing n as enum_items_t (i.e. declaring n as "enum_items_t n"), as well as type casting MAX_ENUM_ITEMS as UINT16. The only other thing I can think of at this point is that maybe there is an issue with the number of items there are in my enumerated type (919). Does anyone know if there are such constraints on enumerated types? I'm using a GCC based compiler. Or, if you have any other ideas, it would be much appreciated. Thanks.

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How did you check that execution continues within a loop? – Pavel Minaev Sep 30 '09 at 18:48
    
When you say the test fails, have you actually added code to make sure it evaluates as false (e.g. if (n < MAX...) {printf...}), or do you simply mean it should fail? – Jefromi Sep 30 '09 at 18:49
    
Yes, I have done a lot of debugging of this and single-stepping through the code. I can watch in my debugger where n is incremented to the same value as MAX_ENUM_ITEMS (919), and then the compare fails. Instead of jumping out of the loop, execution continues within it. – Jim Fell Sep 30 '09 at 18:54
    
I'd try it with a different version of gcc. I have (once) had a compiler glitch which caused execution flow to go very strange places. – Jefromi Sep 30 '09 at 18:59
    
Are you compiling with optimizations on? If so, the compiler can see that some bits of code are similar inside the loop and after it, and shuffle them around them; at that point, debugger gets confused when it tries to determine the source code line corresponding to current instruction, and can occasionally show IP stepping inside the loop for one or two instructions, while in reality it is elsewhere. I'm not sure about g++, but I've seen this many times with VC++ and aggressive optimization settings. The best way to check here is really to printf. – Pavel Minaev Sep 30 '09 at 19:04
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Could it be an off-by-one error? I would expect that gcc starts enums at 0... but you say you saw the value increase to 919 while debugging. So that makes me think either you've got an extra value in the enum by accident or the enum values are 1-based just like the naming scheme implies.

If ITEM_1 == 1 then either start your n at 1... or change the value of MAX_ENUM_ITEMS as follows:

typedef enum enum_items_tag
{
   ITEM_1,
   ITEM_2,
   ITEM_3,

   /* ... */

   ITEM_918,
   MAX_ENUM_ITEMS = ITEM_918
} enum_items_t;
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch. To test, add ITEM_0 to the enum. – GManNickG Sep 30 '09 at 18:58
    
I'm pretty sure GCC starts enums at 0. I almost believe this is a standard, but I don't have a copy of the standard. It seems like something that would be standardized - it can't have a huge impact on implementations. – Chris Lutz Sep 30 '09 at 19:12
2  
@Chris: It is in the Standard (6.7.2.2 in n1256.pdf) "3 ... If the first enumerator has no =, the value of its enumeration constant is 0. ..." – pmg Sep 30 '09 at 19:34
    
Yep, the offset turned out to be the problem. Good catch! – Jim Fell Sep 30 '09 at 19:55

Try starting your loop with n = ITEM_1?

share|improve this answer

ISO C is rather vague on internal representation of enums, but one thing it does guarantee is that the type used should be wide enough to handle all values, so long as you don't exceed the limit for int. Unless you're using some compiler switch to enable implementation-specific behavior which sets enum representation to something fixed (like a char).

In any case, try printing out sizeof(enum_items_t) and see what you get.

Also, int should be at least 16 bits wide per ISO C, but on embedded platforms (and especially DSPs) you run into all kinds of weird things, so check if int is really 16-bit, as well.

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Sounds not really like the problem as it is not a "round" binary number that causes the trouble. To be honest this sounds to me more like a gcc bug. – jdehaan Sep 30 '09 at 19:07

I'd print out MAX_ENUM_ITEMS just to make sure that the value of it is what you think it should be. With a list that long it would not be difficult to messs it up.

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