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I'm looking to find the best way to convert a ListenableFuture<Iterable<A>> into a sequence of individual ListenableFutures. This is the kind of method signature I'm looking for:

public <A, B> Iterable<ListenableFuture<B>> splitAndRun(
    final ListenableFuture<Iterable<A>> elements, 
    final Function<A, B> func, 
    final ListeningExecutorService executor
);

Clearly I could do with if I returned ListenableFuture<Iterable<ListenableFuture<B>>>, but I feel like I should be able to split and run this and maintain its asynchronicity.

Here's the code I have so far, but you will notice the nasty .get() at the end, which rather ruins things. Please excuse me if I've overcomplicated things.

public class CallableFunction<I, O> implements Callable<O>{
  private final I input;
  private final Function<I, O> func;

  public CallableFunction(I input, Function<I, O> func) {
    this.input = input;
    this.func = func;
  }

  @Override public O call() throws Exception {
    return func.apply(input);
  }
}

public <A, B> Iterable<ListenableFuture<B>> splitAndRun(
    final ListenableFuture<Iterable<A>> elements, 
    final Function<A, B> func, 
    final ListeningExecutorService executor
) throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
  return Futures.transform(elements, 
      new Function<Iterable<A>, Iterable<ListenableFuture<B>>>() {
    @Override
    public Iterable<ListenableFuture<B>> apply(Iterable<A> input) {
      return Iterables.transform(input, new Function<A, ListenableFuture<B>>() {
        @Override
        public ListenableFuture<B> apply(A a) {
          return executor.submit(new CallableFunction<A, B>(a, func));
        }
      });
    }
  }, executor).get();
}
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Consider Chris Povirk's second answer as the solution to your problem. With some adaptation, it will only result in a single get of waiting on the combined future. With Mairbek Khadikov's answer you will need to have at least 2 gets in your code. In any case, +1 for the question. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 23 '13 at 18:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(alternative to my original answer)

But what if the transformation is slow or if it might fail for some inputs but succeed for others? In that case, we want to transform each output individually. Plus, we want to ensure that the transformation happens only once. Our collection transformation methods do not make this guarantee. As a result, in your example code, every iteration over the output will submit new tasks to the executor, even though the previously submitted tasks may have already completed. For this reason, we recommend Iterables.transform and friends only when the transformation is lightweight. (Typically, if you're doing something heavyweight, your transformation function will throw a checked exception, which Function doesn't allow. Consider this a hint :) Your example, of course, happens not to trigger the hint.)

What does that all mean in code? Basically, we'll reverse the order of operations that I gave in my other answer. We'll convert from Future<Iterable<A>> to Iterable<Future<A>> first. Then we'll submit a separate task for each A to convert it to a B. For this latter step, we'll supply an Executor so that the transformation doesn't block some innocent thread. (We'll now need only Futures.transform, so I've static imported it.)

List<ListenableFuture<A>> individuals = newArrayList();
for (int i = 0; i < knownSize; i++) {
  final int index = i;
  individuals.add(transform(input, new Function<List<A>, A>() {
    @Override
    public A apply(List<A> values) {
      return values.get(index);
    }
  }));
}

List<ListenableFuture<B>> result = newArrayList();
for (ListenableFuture<A> original : individuals) {
  result.add(transform(original, function, executor));
}
return result;

That's the idea, anyway. But my implementation is dumb. We can easily do both steps at the same time:

List<ListenableFuture<B>> result = newArrayList();
for (int i = 0; i < knownSize; i++) {
  final int index = i;
  result.add(transform(input, new Function<List<A>, B>() {
    @Override
    public B apply(List<A> values) {
      return function.apply(values.get(index));
    }
  }, executor));
}
return result;

Because this makes n Futures.transform calls instead of 1 and because it uses a separate Executor, it's better than my other solution if the transformation is heavyweight and worse if it's lightweight. The other caveat remains: This will work only if you know how many outputs you'll have.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. In my view, 2nd example is THE SOLUTION to OP's problem. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 23 '13 at 18:14
    
....... and mine :) –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Mar 23 '13 at 18:21
    
This is a nice solution as it has not explicate blocking. Unfortunately in practice it's no different to my original implementation as there is an implicate block in getting the first element of the list. This doesn't make the solution bad or wrong, I like it, but it has to wait for that initial list to become available. –  Ben Smith Mar 26 '13 at 9:11
    
Actually, thinking about it, this is as close as you'll get to the 'right' answer so I might as well mark it as such. An implicate block that can happen later on is better than my explicate block that has to occur now. –  Ben Smith Mar 26 '13 at 9:15
1  
... although I did miss the 'knownSize' sneaked in there ;) –  Ben Smith Apr 9 '13 at 19:24

If you think of ListenableFuture as a box, in order to get something from that box you have to block the thread (call the get method).

Not sure that implementing splitAndRun method could benefit you in some way. You would still have one single asynchronous operation that returns ListenableFuture<Iterable<A>>.

Reverse operation of joining Iterable<ListenableFuture<A>> as a single ListenableFuture<Iterable<A>> could be useful, though. You might want to use it in case if you want to collect several asynchronous computation into a single one.

share|improve this answer
3  
For the reverse operation, that would be Futures.allAsList(). –  Frank Pavageau Feb 21 '13 at 14:07
    
Yeah, this is fair enough. I was hoping that Google might have some clever collection that works on futures and will iterate through them based on their completion state. Unfortunately that would be terrifying. –  Ben Smith Feb 22 '13 at 8:07

There are two parts to this. The first is transforming a Future<Iterable<A>> to a Future<Iterable<B>>. That can be accomplished by nesting Futures.transform and Iterables.transform (if the transformation is fast -- more on that in an alternative answer). Here's the code (though I've swapped out Iterables.transform for Lists.transform, which will require a Future<List<A>>, for reasons that I'll also explain later):

final ListenableFuture<List<B>> transformed =
    Futures.transform(input, new Function<List<A>, List<B>>() {
      @Override
      public List<B> apply(List<A> inputs) {
        return Lists.transform(inputs, function);
      }
    });

Now comes the conversion from Future<Iterable<B>> to Iterable<Future<B>>. As Mairbek said, this isn't possible in general: We can't know how many elements the output will have until we know how many the Future will return. If we do know the number of elements in the output, though, we can make it work. We'll apply another Futures.transform. (And that's why I used List above. Plain Collection could also work, but the code would be uglier.)

List<ListenableFuture<B>> result = newArrayList();
for (int i = 0; i < knownSize; i++) {
  final int index = i;
  result.add(Futures.transform(transformed, new Function<List<B>, B>() {
    @Override
    public B apply(List<B> values) {
      return values.get(index);
    }
  }));
}
return result;

Of course, every Future in the list will complete at the same time -- only when the full input Future is done. That is, we can't get the results earlier; we can get them only in a different format (namely, individual Future instances instead of a bulk list). That's a necessary limitation of starting with a Future<Iterable<A>>.

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