Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there a way to find out which property of the objects threw the exception. I have a Class with 3 properties. I want to give a message to the user that a particular property in the class is wrong.

public class Numbers
{
    public string Num1 { get; set; }
    public string Num2 { get; set; }
    public string Num3 { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var numbers = new Numbers() { Num1 = "22", Num2 = "err", Num3 = "33" };
        // Call an extension method which tries convert to Int
        var num = numbers.Num1.StringToInt();
         num = numbers.Num2.StringToInt();
         num = numbers.Num3.StringToInt();

        Console.WriteLine(num);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

public static class SampleExtension
{
    static StackTrace stackTrace = new StackTrace(true);

    // Extension method that converts string to Int
    public static int StringToInt(this string number)
    {
        try
        {
            // Intentionally used 'Convert' instead of 'TryParse' to raise an exception
            return Convert.ToInt32(number);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Show a msg to the user that Numbers.Num2 is wrong. "Input string not in correct format"
            var msg = stackTrace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().ToString();
            msg = ex.Message;
            msg += ex.StackTrace;
            throw;
        }
    }
}

I'm using an extension method to convert sting to int. And i'm looking for a way to catch the wrong property in the extension method itself. I'm using .Net framework 4.0. Please suggest.

share|improve this question
    
Properties are still methods. What does .GetMethod() gives for you when you walk in the stack trace? – Matías Fidemraizer Feb 21 '13 at 11:02
    
Is there any reason why are you not using Exception class property StackTrace (ex.StackTrace) and using some static member property instead? – Biggles Feb 21 '13 at 11:06
    
You can code extension method on Numbers type with argument of Expression that get property of Numbers type with lambda extension. – Reza ArabQaeni Feb 21 '13 at 11:08
    
@Matías Fidemraizer .GetMethod()gives me the extension method name alone. – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:32
    
@GaneshKumar Ah, my friend. Let me compose the answer ;) – Matías Fidemraizer Feb 21 '13 at 11:33

I would use Int32.TryParse instead, then you can explicitly handle the failure to parse.

public static int StringToInt(this string number)
        {
            try
            {
                int result;
                if (!Int32.TryParse(number, out result))
                {
                    // handle the parse failure
                }
                return result;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to capture the property name. Irrespective of what kind of conversion mechanism we are using, My intention was to find out which is the property that called this method and resulted in an error – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:10

Why not simply supply all needed data to the method during call? Schematically (you can extend it):

public static int ToInt(string number, string info)
{
    try
    {
        // ...
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(info);
    }
}

// and usage
string str1 = "123";
int n = ToInt(str1, "Trying to parsing str1");
share|improve this answer
    
I tried to put some sample code. I'm trying to implement this is a very large system. We cannot imagine changing all the parameters and hardcode the property name. That is the reason I'm trying to find a generic way. – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:41

Note

I was answering this question based on .NET 4.5 because the question had no tag for an specific framework version. I leave the answer here because it may be useful for future visitors using .NET 4.5.

I would like to say that your code sample is very ugly since you could overcome this problem by using int.TryParse, but as I guess you wanted to show a generalized case (bad choice) and you just want to know the caller name of the extension method: check the [CallerMemeberNameAttribute] introduced in the 4.5 version of .NET Framework:

For example, either in an extension or regular method, do this:

public void Method([CallerMemberName] string callerName)
{
}

And the CLR will set the input parameter with the name of the caller!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I wanted to rise an exception, that is the reason why I didn't use TryParse. My intension was to apply the solution on a larger system. i've just scribbled some code to bring the context. Anyways, I'm using ** .Net framework 4.0 **. Is there any work around for that – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:45
    
@GaneshKumar You should tag the question with the framework version. – Matías Fidemraizer Feb 21 '13 at 11:47
    
@GaneshKumar It's harder. One option could be PostSharp. Are you familiar with AOP? – Matías Fidemraizer Feb 21 '13 at 11:48
    
Missed to tag the framework version. I did that just now. I'm not that good at PostSharp, but it is implemented in the code. Any suggestions how to do it using PostSharp would help. Thanks – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:53
    
@GaneshKumar Nevermind. – Matías Fidemraizer Feb 21 '13 at 11:58
public static int StringToInt(this Numbers number,
 Expression<Func<Numbers, string>> prop)
{
    try
    {
        return Convert.ToInt32(prop.Compile()(number));
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        var expression = (MemberExpression)prop.Body;
        string name = expression.Member.Name;
        throw new MissingMemberException(string.Format("Invalid member {0}", name));
    }
}

And call it:

var num = numbers.StringToInt(p=>p.Num1);
share|improve this answer
    
What is prop(obj) ? – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:28
    
@GaneshKumar Ohh, edited. – Reza ArabQaeni Feb 21 '13 at 11:32
    
Tried that. prop doesn't have the name of the property. It has some data like this {Method = {System.String <Main>b__2(Sample.Numbers)}} – Ganesh Kumar Feb 21 '13 at 11:39
    
@Ganesh Kumar excuse me for late response, code edited. – Reza ArabQaeni Feb 24 '13 at 6:17
    
Thank you. I'll check that – Ganesh Kumar Feb 28 '13 at 11:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.