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I have this example from an "easy" ruby quiz. I want to re-assign the value of an array (e.g. word1[0]) if it equals (==) the value of array1 to the value of array2. Take a look at the code so it is obvious:

array1 = Array.new
array1 = ('A'..'Z').to_a

array2 = Array.new
array2 = ('A'..'Z').to_a
array2 = array2.rotate(2)

puts "enter a word:"
word1 = gets.chomp
word1 = word1.upcase.split(//)

n = 0

word1.each do
  while n < 26
    if word1[n] == array1[n]
      word1[n] = array2[n]
    end
    n += 1
  end
end

puts word1   # This word should now be "encoded" and not easy to read.

I have tried this code and it kind of randomly changes only 1-2 letters of any word that i type in (gets.chomp).

Hence word1 is an Array I am expecting, that each element (letter) gets compared to array1[0] and if it equals then it will be re-assigned to the value of array2[0]. If word1[0] and array1[0] are not equal then the value of 'n' changes +1 and the block is run again.

NOTE: I don't want to have an easy formula for this problem, I want to really understand what is going on here and WHY my each-iteration does not work as i expect. So if you can answer this question at "my level of knowledge" that would be really awesome!

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3 Answers 3

First, you forgot to reset the counter N between consecutive the words. You set the N to zero, then you start to iterate over the words.

So, in the overview, your algo behaves like that:

For first word, the N iterates over 0..25
For second word, the N starts with 26, and DOES NOT iterate at all
For third word, the N starts with 26, and does not iterate
.. etc.

So, for complete starters, do:

array1 = Array.new
array1 = ('A'..'Z').to_a

array2 = Array.new
array2 = ('A'..'Z').to_a
array2 = array2.rotate(2)

puts "enter a word:"
word1 = gets.chomp
word1 = word1.upcase.split(//)     # <-- note that you REPLACE the input string
                                   # with an sequence of STRINGS produced by SPLIT

word1.each do                      # for each STRING in the SEQUENCE
  n = 0
  while n < 26                     # scan all 26 letters from ARRAY
    if word1[n] == array1[n]       # ... WTF
      word1[n] = array2[n]
    end
    n += 1
  end
end

Now you will keep the letter scanning at least running in the same way for every one word. However, this will not work as expected either, but wholly different reason.

How do you use the N actually?

    if word1[n] == array1[n]
      word1[n] = array2[n]
    end

So, you read Nth WORD from the SEQUENCE
.. and compare it against Nth LETTER from the array1.

Is it really what you wanted to do? Quite not.

You most probably wanted to replace every letter in WORD along with letter-pairs formed by the two arrays.

So, instead, you wanted to:

  • read the Nth letters from WORD1
  • then check at what index it is in the array1
  • and then read the substitution letter from that index
  • and then write the letter back at Nth place in WORD:

    letter = word[position]
    letterindex = array1.index(letter)
    substitution = array2[letterindex]
    word[position] = subsitution
    

You can compact it into oneliner too:

 -- loop
    -- loop2
      word[position] = array2[array1.index(word[position])]

However, please note that I say now position, not N. You've used N as range 0..25, which means the index of the letter in ARRAY.

But, for inspecting the word's letters, you need to iterate over the word's letters. How long is the word? Certainly, not 0..25!

Also note the subtle change: word instead of word1. I say "word" and "word's letters", not "arrayofwords". Originally, you used N also to read Nth word from the sequence, let's keep it. But as we need to iterate over word's leters, a different variable is needed, 'say position:

n = 0

arrayOfWords.each do

    word = arrayOfWords[n]

    position = 0

    while position < word.length
        letter = word[position]
        letterindex = array1.index(letter)
        substitution = array2[letterindex]
        word[position] = subsitution
        position += 1
    end

    n += 1
end

Note how N stays and only increases with each word, and how position is reset everytime to zero, to iterate over actual length of the current word.

In Ruby, this is overly elaborate way to do that. Ruby has a lot of nice tricks that can shorten the code. For example, the each method is not only a loop. It actually gives you each word*, you don't need the N at all:

arrayOfWords.each do |word|

    position = 0

    while position < word.length
       word[position] = array2[array1.index(word[position])]
       position += 1
    end

end

Note how I added "word" in bars || to the each call. In similar way you actually could get rid of the position too, but that would in turn make the code shorter but much harder to read/understand.

share|improve this answer
    
You should be teaching class! :) Thank you so much –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 13:18
    
no no no this is so much wrong:( sorry, I've misread one of your original lines. Please wait a while, I'll update the post –  quetzalcoatl Feb 21 '13 at 13:20
    
at least you already made me understand to reset my counter between iterations! –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 13:23
    
I've updated the post, and I've renamed the variables so it's now clear what-is-what. Although I've included almost full solution, I suggest you try writing your own from scratch afterwards:) have fun! –  quetzalcoatl Feb 21 '13 at 13:34
    
that's awesome, thank you very much –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 13:36

I think the problem is that you are using the same "counter" n to check two different arrays, try this:

EDIT According to your comments, since you need only so scramble, here is a possible way:

array1 = ('A'..'Z').to_a
array2 = ('A'..'Z').to_a.shuffle

puts "enter a word:"
word1 = gets.chomp
word1 = word1.upcase.split(//)

n = 0

word1.each do
  word1[n] = array2[n]
  n +=1
end

puts word1

It will always generate a different input, even if you use the same word, because of the shuffle in your array2

share|improve this answer
    
I run your code and it has the same outcome as mine. Try run your code and you will se my problem. –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 12:44
    
Please show me a expected output ;) –  Gerep Feb 21 '13 at 12:48
    
input: HELLO; output:JGNNQ because of H=J, E=G L=N, L=N, O=Q; –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 12:53
    
So you need the "encoded" value but you need do "decode" it? –  Gerep Feb 21 '13 at 12:53
    
I just want to have it encoded. I am already trying with 2 counters (n, t) thanks to your advice and it looks better. –  rubybrah Feb 21 '13 at 12:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally managed to answer my question with a very simple approach:

def cypher(input_array)

  normal_array = ['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z']
  cypher_array = normal_array.rotate(2)
  awesome_cyphered_array = []

  input_array.each do |element|
    0.upto(25) do |i|
      case element
        when normal_array[i]
          awesome_cyphered_array << cypher_array[i]
      end
    end
  end
  puts awesome_cyphered_array.join  
end

# START of my program
puts "Enter a sentence, it will be cyphered!"
sentence = gets.chomp
length = sentence.length
sentence_as_array = sentence.upcase.split(//).reverse!

make_it_an_array = []

1.upto(length) do 
  make_it_an_array << sentence_as_array.pop
end

cypher(make_it_an_array)
share|improve this answer
    
Please don't take this comment as offensive, but: (1) shorter does not mean simplier, (2) it is still far more complicated than it should be (you use upto/case/when in very weird way and also string->array is a one liner without a loop, etc..), (3) this code actually does not answer your question - it answers your problem that generated the question, but not the question, (4) I don't really need that 15rep from 'accepted' answer, but I think it's quite inappropriate to reassign points after a few months - you seemed quite happy with previous answers, so why jump back in time? ;) –  quetzalcoatl May 8 '13 at 17:10
    
Dont delete your answer/code, just polish it better! remove that strange string-to-array conversion (String class has 'each_char' method) and change the upto(25)-case-when to some reasonable lookup, either with a single simple hash or 'index' method. Really, there's no need to loop everywhere ;) –  quetzalcoatl May 8 '13 at 17:12
    
you are right, my answer can still be refactored. but it is easier to understand for me as a ruby beginner, and that is simply why i wanted to post it. i will refactor it within the next days. thanks for the positive feedback! thanks for your help –  rubybrah May 8 '13 at 23:37

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