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Yes, I know there is a function for this, but this is a (very simple) function to learn OpenCV basics.

I checked the pseudo-code five times and am pretty sure this is no logical error.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <opencv2/core/core.hpp>
#include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp>
#include <opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp>
using namespace cv;

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    if (argc!=2 || argv[1]=="") {
        printf("No image specified.");
        exit(-1);
    }
    Mat im, out;
    const string fn = argv[1];

    im = cv::imread(fn);
    out.create(im.cols, im.rows, CV_8UC3);

    //int tmp = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < out.rows; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < out.cols; j++) {
            out.at<cv::Vec3d>(i, j) = im.at<cv::Vec3d>(im.rows-1-j, i);
            /*
             *if (tmp<1000) {tmp++;}
             *else {imwrite("/tmp/out.png", out); tmp=0;}
             */
        }
    }

    imwrite("/tmp/in.png", im);
    imwrite("/tmp/out.png", out);

    return 0;
}

Result

I noticed that the width in the out picture is stretched exactly 3 times (1px→3px).
Plus, segmentation fault at the return.

Update:

Here’s the pseudo-code:

for(row=0; row<out.rows; row++) {
    for(col = 0; col<out.cols; col++) {
        out[row][col] = in[(in.rows-1)-col][row];
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are reading the image as a grayscale image: cv::imread(name, 0).

You should change that to: cv::imread(name, 1), otherwise you cannot use im.at<cv::Vec3b>(i, j) (notice the Vec3b, instead of Vec3d, where b stands for unsigned char, d means double)

share|improve this answer
    
Huh, sorry, I changed that in my code and forgot to re-paste. So no, that’s not the problem with this (otherwise the pictures are greyscale, too). – Profpatsch Feb 21 '13 at 13:25
    
Do you use Vec3b or Vec3d? You did not change that in your question. – bjoernz Feb 21 '13 at 13:29
    
You, sir, win all my Internets. For me this has always been a 3D vector. Why stop templating here? I don’t get it. Must be a C++ thing. – Profpatsch Feb 21 '13 at 13:39
    
Oh, blasted. Don’t mind me, today is not my day. Of course this is templated, these are only typedef shorcuts… – Profpatsch Feb 21 '13 at 13:59

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