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How could I implement function Foo to dispatch to the correct function?

The following code reproduces the problem, and got some additional information in comments.

#include <string>

class Base  
{
public:
virtual ~Base(){};
};

template<typename T>
class Derived : public Base 
{};

void DoSomething(const Derived<std::string> &){};
void DoSomething(const Derived<int> &){};

void Foo(Base *test)
{
    // How to call correct DoSomething method?
    // (I can't change class Base, but I know that test points to some instance of class Derived)?
    // if(test points to an instance of Derived<int>)
    //     call void DoSomething(const Derived<int> &){};
    // else if(test points to an instance of Derived<std::string>)
    //     call void DoSomething(const Derived<std::string> &){};
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Base *test = new Derived<int>;

    Foo(test);

    delete test;
    return 0;
}
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1  
The same as for non-templated base classes. –  juanchopanza Feb 21 '13 at 12:47
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As to the OO, only the derived class itself knows who it is, and what to do.

#include <string>
class Base {}
class Mid : public Base
{
public:
    virtual void DoSomething() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
class Derived : public Mid 
{
public:
    virtual void DoSomething() {}
};

template<> void Derived<std::string>::DoSomething(){}
template<> void Derived<int>::DoSomething(){}

void Foo(Base *test)
{
    dynamic_cast<Mid*>(test)->DoSomething(); //TODO check the return of dynamic_cast
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Base *test = new Derived<int>;

    Foo(test);

    delete test;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't change base class... –  nabulke Feb 21 '13 at 13:05
    
@nabulke can you at least tell us whether the base class is polymorphic? –  enobayram Feb 21 '13 at 13:17
    
it is polymorphic, I change the example code accordingly –  nabulke Feb 21 '13 at 13:19
2  
@nabulke How about add a class between Base and Derived ? class Mid : public Base { virtual void DoSomething()=0; }; template<typename T> class Derived : public Mid {...}; void Foo(Base *test) { dynamic_cast<Mid*>(test)->DoSomething(); } –  shuiyu Feb 21 '13 at 13:49
    
With a dynamic_cast you need to check whether what's returned is null or not. If you don't need to check it (because you know the dynamic type due to context), you should use a static_cast instead. –  enobayram Feb 21 '13 at 14:00
show 1 more comment
#include <string>

class Base  
{};

class DerivedBase : public Base 
{
public:
    virtual void DoSomething() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
class Derived : public DerivedBase
{};

void Foo(Base *test)
{
   if (auto* p = dynamic_cast<DerivedBase*>(test))
       p->DoSomething();
   else
       throw runtime_error("oops");
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   Base *test = new Derived<int>;

   Foo(test);

   delete test;
   return 0;
}

If you declare an intermediate class, you can use polymorphism without changing Base. You only have to do one dynamic_cast<> but you won't have to change Foo() each time you want to use a new type as a template argument, thus having your code respect the Open/Closed Principle.

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I thought about this too--I think it depends on the greater context the OP is operating within, which we can't entirely visualize. I can imagine some worlds where this would be a very good solution. –  John Zwinck Feb 21 '13 at 13:53
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How to call correct DoSomething method?

It's much better is take advantage of how polymorphism works in C++ rather than to write some dispatch function based on casting. A couple of alternatives:

  • Declare DoSomething as a public pure virtual method in class Base. The template will provide the implementation.
  • Define DoSomething as a public non-virtual method in class Base. The implementation invokes some private pure virtual method. The template once again provides the implementation of this virtual method.
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Unfortunately I can't change class Base. –  nabulke Feb 21 '13 at 13:17
    
It seems that Base class can't be modified –  Seb Feb 21 '13 at 13:41
    
So make a class that derives from Base that you can change, and make your class templates derived from this intermediate class rather than directly from Base. –  David Hammen Feb 21 '13 at 15:40
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void Foo(Base *test)
{
  if (auto* p = dynamic_cast<Derived<int>*>(test))
    DoSomething(*p);
  else if (auto* p = dynamic_cast<Derived<string>*>(test))
    DoSomething(*p);
  else
    throw runtime_error("oops");
}

This works because dynamic_cast returns nullptr if the type is not correct. The code above is C++11, but it would be C++98 if you replace the "auto" types with the obvious ones (I'd use a macro if there are lots of cases).

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technically correct but obviously a design that could be drastically improved by using polymorphism –  Seb Feb 21 '13 at 12:54
    
The OP said the Base class cannot be modified. If you have a better solution, let's see it. :) –  John Zwinck Feb 21 '13 at 12:55
    
@jrok: Yes, it does have that restriction and I should have mentioned it. But we don't know if the OP's Base is polymorphic or not (I assume it's not an empty class as in the OP). –  John Zwinck Feb 21 '13 at 12:58
    
Can't we make DoSomething() a member of Derived<T> so we don't have to change Foo(...) when a new type is used for the template ? –  Seb Feb 21 '13 at 13:11
    
I posted an answer. Could you give me your opinion about it ? –  Seb Feb 21 '13 at 13:50
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