Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why when I'd call a.__dict__ the output isn't {name:'rafael',age:28}?

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.name = 'Rafael'

    @property
    def age(self):
        return 28

a = Person()
print a.__dict__
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

The property object itself is in Person.__dict__:

In [16]: Person.__dict__
Out[16]: dict_proxy({'__module__': '__main__', 'age': <property object at 0xa387c0c>, '__dict__': <attribute '__dict__' of 'Person' objects>, '__weakref__': <attribute '__weakref__' of 'Person' objects>, '__doc__': None, '__init__': <function __init__ at 0xa4d66f4>})

a.age is the return value of a function call. It uses the descriptor lookup mechanism to call Person.__dict__['age'].__get__(a,Person).

Python does not store {'age':28} in any __dict__ since the 28 is not necessarily a fixed value. That function called could conceivably return a different value with every call. So it would be meaningless to associate 'age' with just one return value.

Consider, for example,

class Person(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.count = 0
    @property
    def age(self):
        self.count += 1
        return self.count    

a = Person()
print(a.age)
# 1
print(a.age)
# 2
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.