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I have the following piece of code: (extremely simplified for the purposes of this question, but perfectly illustrates the problem I am having)

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

&outer;
my $connected_sub;

sub outer {
    print "HELLO\n";

    &$connected_sub;
    $connected_sub = sub {
        print "GOODBYE\n";
    }
}

When run the program gives this output and error:

HELLO
Use of uninitialized value in subroutine entry at subTesting line 13.
Can't use string ("") as a subroutine ref while "strict refs" in use at subTesting.pl line 13.

Am I totally overlooking something here? I cannot understand or work out what the problem with this is.

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5  
&outer; has a very special meaning (evne more special than &outer()). Don't do that. Use outer(). –  ikegami Feb 21 '13 at 13:49
    
Kindly limit your use of bold to things of unusual importance. No one likes being yelled at all the time. –  darch Feb 21 '13 at 17:23
    
@darch - Okay then, I find it easier to read and understand when things are clearly separated/or titled, which is why I do it, but I appreciate others might not so I'll bear that in mind, thanks –  perl-user Feb 21 '13 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The $connected_sub is not initializated. Try to assign to an anonymous sub:

my $connected_sub = sub {
   print "The code you need to run\n";
}

At the definition, and drop the code after the &$connected_sub call

This is the complete example modified:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;


my $connected_sub = sub {
   print "GOODBYE\n";
};

&outer;

sub outer
{
        print "HELLO\n";
        &$connected_sub;
 } 
share|improve this answer
    
yes I forgot to move &outer after the sub declaration –  Miguel Prz Feb 21 '13 at 13:14
    
thanks very much, following this template worked –  perl-user Feb 21 '13 at 14:32

To clarify:

Subroutine definitions happen in the compilation stage. Thus code like this will work:

foo();

sub foo { print "No need to declare me before calling!"; }

But an assignment doesn't actually happen until that line of code is called. That is why this won't work:

my $foo;

&$foo();

$foo = sub { print "Foo hasn't been set to me when you try to call me." }
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I assume that what you are trying to do here is assign an anonymous sub to the variable $connected_sub. This is not a good way to do it.

What you are doing is taking an empty variable, trying to use it as a code reference, assigning a code reference to it, then exiting the sub and then declaring the variable with my. Not the best order of doing things.

What you probably want to do is return a value which can be assigned to the variable, like so:

my $connected = outer();
$connected->();

sub outer {
    print "HELLO\n";
    my $sub = sub { print "GOODBYE\n"; }
    return $sub;
}

Using a lexical variable inside a subroutine is somewhat confusing, I think. Besides the general drawbacks of using global variables, the subroutine is also compiled before the code is executed and the variable declared.

Also, when calling a subroutine, the standard way of doing so is

name(@args);

Where @args is your argument list. Using & is old style perl, and using it has a special meaning (override prototypes). When using an anonymous sub in a variable, use the ->() notation.

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thanks for the point about using ->() with anonymous sub routines, will remember that in the future –  perl-user Feb 21 '13 at 14:33
    
Actually, declarations happen at compile time. Initializations happen at run time. Yes, that means that my $x = 5; has both a compile-time and a run-time effect. –  darch Feb 21 '13 at 17:17

Looks like you're using $connected_stub before it is initialized. Try to move the initialization up, like:

    $connected_sub = sub {
    print "GOODBYE\n";

    }
    &$connected_sub;
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