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I have this generic singleton that looks like this:

public class Cache<T>
{
    private Dictionary<Guid, T> cachedBlocks;

    // Constructors and stuff, to mention this is a singleton

    public T GetCache(Guid id)
    {
        if (!cachedBlocks.ContainsKey(id))
            cachedBlocks.Add(id, LoadFromSharePoint(id))
        return cachedBlocks[id];
    }

    public T LoadFromSharePoint(Guid id)
    {
        return new T(id)    // Here is the problem.
    }
}

The error message is:

Cannot create an instance of type T because it does not have the new() constraint.

I have to mention that I must pass that id parameter, and there is no other way to do so. Any ideas on how to solve this would be highly appreciated.

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a related q: stackoverflow.com/questions/3550173/… –  nawfal Apr 14 '13 at 8:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Normally you would constrain the type T to a type that has a default constructor and call that. Then you'd have to add a method or property to be able to provide the value of id to the instance.

public static T LoadFromSharePoint<T>(Guid id)
    where T : new()     // <-- Constrain to types with a default constructor
{
    T value = new T();
    value.ID = id;
    return value;
}

Alternatively since you specify that you have to provide the id parameter through the constructor, you can invoke a parameterized constructor using reflection. You must be sure the type defines the constructor you want to invoke. You cannot constrain the generic type T to types that have a particular constructor other than the default constructor. (E.g. where T : new(Guid) does not work.)

For example, I know there is a constructor new List<string>(int capacity) on List<T>, which can be invoked like this:

var type = typeof(List<String>);
object list = Activator.CreateInstance(type, /* capacity */ 20);

Of course, you might want to do some casting (to T) afterwards.

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it sounds like a great idea, but I can not say value.ID = id, it just wont let me, tho I'm pretty close to getting it. Any other tips? Thanks a lot so far by the way :) –  Alex Oltean Feb 21 '13 at 13:19
    
@AlexOltean The second part of my answer is an alternative, for when you cannot say value.ID = id. Try that :D –  Virtlink Feb 21 '13 at 13:23
    
AWESOME answer, thanks man, you saved me a lot of time –  Alex Oltean Feb 21 '13 at 13:31
    
@AlexOltean while this answer might work, its really not the right way to do at all. Reflection is totally unwarranted here. Besides being slower, its not the right approach. Your code is more expressive of what it does without reflection. With reflection you're making things obscure. You will learn that with time. –  nawfal Feb 21 '13 at 13:36
1  
@nawfal I am not in favor of reflection. My first suggestion is essentially the same as yours, but you showed it on the class and with an interface. I interpreted the "I must pass that id parameter, and there is no other way to do so" literally, and then the only solution is reflection, as you'll have to agree. –  Virtlink Feb 21 '13 at 13:39

To do this you should specify what T is. Your Cache<T> can hold anything? Tiger, Fridge and int as well? That is not a sound design. You should constrain it. You need an instance of T which will take a Guid to construct the instance. That's not a generic T. Its a very specific T. Change your code to:

public class Cache<T> where T : Cacheable, new()
{
    private Dictionary<Guid, T> cachedBlocks;

    // Constructors and stuff, to mention this is a singleton

    public T GetCache(Guid id)
    {
        if (!cachedBlocks.ContainsKey(id))
            cachedBlocks.Add(id, LoadFromSharePoint(id))
        return cachedBlocks[id];

       //you're first checking for presence, and then adding to it
       //which does the same checking again, and then returns the
       //value of key again which will have to see for it again. 
       //Instead if its ok you can directly return

       //return cachedBlocks[id] = LoadFromSharePoint(id);

       //if your LoadFromSharePoint is not that expensive.
       //mind you this is little different from your original 
       //approach as to what it does.
    }

    public T LoadFromSharePoint(Guid id)
    {
        return new T { Key = id };    // Here is no more problem.
    }
}

public interface Cacheable
{
    Guid Key { get; set; }
}

Now derive all the cacheables (whatever Ts that you will pass it for Cache<T>) from the interface Cacheable.

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That would work too, especially because I would avoid using reflection –  Alex Oltean Feb 21 '13 at 13:33
    
Thanks a lot by the way! –  Alex Oltean Feb 21 '13 at 13:34
    
@AlexOltean glad it worked. I commented on the other post without seeing your this comment. Cheers –  nawfal Feb 21 '13 at 13:38
    
@AlexOltean i edited my answer, you can make your code faster with my suggestion. Only that now it updates the value corresponding to id each time (if id key is present) and returns it in one go. It depends on how expensive your LoadFromSharePoint which i think is not at all. –  nawfal Feb 21 '13 at 13:46

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