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Following my recent question Select information from last item and join to the total amount, I am having some memory problems while generation tables

I have two tables sales1 and sales2 like this:

id | dates | customer | sale

With this table definition:

CREATE TABLE sales (
    id int auto_increment primary key, 
    dates date,
    customer int,
    sale int
);

sales1 and sales2 have the same definition, but sales2 has sale=-1 in every field. A customer can be in none, one or both tables. Both tables have around 300.000 records and much more fields than indicated here (around 50 fields). They are InnoDB.

I want to select, for each customer:

  • number of purchases
  • last purchase value
  • total amount of purchases, when it has a positive value

The query I am using is:

SELECT a.customer, count(a.sale), max_sale
FROM sales a
INNER JOIN (SELECT customer, sale max_sale 
        from sales x where dates = (select max(dates) 
                                    from sales y 
                                    where x.customer = y.customer
                                    and y.sale > 0
                                   )

       )b
ON a.customer = b.customer
GROUP BY a.customer, max_sale;

The problem is:

I have to get the results, that I need for certain calculations, separated for dates: information on year 2012, information on year 2013, but also information from all the years together.

Whenever I do just one year, it takes about 2-3 minutes to storage all the information.

But when I try to gather information from all the years, the database crashes and I get messages like:

InternalError: (InternalError) (1205, u'Lock wait timeout exceeded; try restarting transaction')

It seems that joining such huge tables is too much for the database. When I explain the query, almost all the percentage of time comes from creating tmp table.

I thought in splitting the data gathering in quarters. We get the results for every three months and then join and sort it. But I guess this final join and sort will be too much for the database again.

So, what would you experts recommend to optimize these queries as long as I cannot change the tables structure?

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1  
How are you joining the tables? You're not cross joining 300,000 rows together, are you? That would be 90-billion rows... –  Explosion Pills Feb 21 '13 at 13:59
    
And yet somehow awesome –  DiMono Feb 21 '13 at 13:59
1  
300,000 rows in a table definitely doesn't constitute huge. –  Will A Feb 21 '13 at 13:59
    
Post updated with the query I am using! –  fedorqui Feb 21 '13 at 14:00
    
We need to see the select statement broken down; or you can use the explain plan to determine where your holdup is in performance. You do have a index on dates and customers right? –  xQbert Feb 21 '13 at 14:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+100

300k rows is not a huge table. We frequently see 300 million row tables.

The biggest problem with your query is that you're using a correlated subquery, so it has to re-execute the subquery for each row in the outer query.

It's often the case that you don't need to do all your work in one SQL statement. There are advantages to breaking it up into several simpler SQL statements:

  • Easier to code.
  • Easier to optimize.
  • Easier to debug.
  • Easier to read.
  • Easier to maintain if/when you have to implement new requirements.

Number of Purchases

SELECT customer, COUNT(sale) AS number_of_purchases
FROM sales 
GROUP BY customer;

An index on sales(customer,sale) would be best for this query.

Last Purchase Value

This is the greatest-n-per-group problem that comes up frequently.

SELECT a.customer, a.sale as max_sale
FROM sales a
LEFT OUTER JOIN sales b
 ON a.customer=b.customer AND a.dates < b.dates
WHERE b.customer IS NULL;

In other words, try to match row a to a hypothetical row b that has the same customer and a greater date. If no such row is found, then a must have the greatest date for that customer.

An index on sales(customer,dates,sale) would be best for this query.

If you might have more than one sale for a customer on that greatest date, this query will return more than one row per customer. You'd need to find another column to break the tie. If you use an auto-increment primary key, it's suitable as a tie breaker because it's guaranteed to be unique and it tends to increase chronologically.

SELECT a.customer, a.sale as max_sale
FROM sales a
LEFT OUTER JOIN sales b
 ON a.customer=b.customer AND (a.dates < b.dates OR a.dates = b.dates and a.id < b.id)
WHERE b.customer IS NULL;

Total Amount of Purchases, When It Has a Positive Value

SELECT customer, SUM(sale) AS total_purchases
FROM sales
WHERE sale > 0
GROUP BY customer;

An index on sales(customer,sale) would be best for this query.

You should consider using NULL to signify a missing sale value instead of -1. Aggregate functions like SUM() and COUNT() ignore NULLs, so you don't have to use a WHERE clause to exclude rows with sale < 0.


Re: your comment

What I have now is a table with fields year, quarter, total_sale (regarding to the pair (year,quarter)) and sale. What I want to gather is information regarding certain period: this quarter, quarters, year 2011... Info has to be splitted in top customers, ones with bigger sales, etc. Would it be possible to get the last purchase value from customers with total_purchases bigger than 5?

Top Five Customers for Q4 2012

SELECT customer, SUM(sale) AS total_purchases
FROM sales
WHERE (year, quarter) = (2012, 4) AND sale > 0
GROUP BY customer
ORDER BY total_purchases DESC
LIMIT 5;

I'd want to test it against real data, but I believe an index on sales(year, quarter, customer, sale) would be best for this query.

Last Purchase for Customers with Total Purchases > 5

SELECT a.customer, a.sale as max_sale
FROM sales a
INNER JOIN sales c ON a.customer=c.customer
LEFT OUTER JOIN sales b
 ON a.customer=b.customer AND (a.dates < b.dates OR a.dates = b.dates and a.id < b.id)
WHERE b.customer IS NULL
GROUP BY a.id
HAVING COUNT(*) > 5;

As in the other greatest-n-per-group query above, an index on sales(customer,dates,sale) would be best for this query. It probably can't optimize both the join and the group by, so this will incur a temporary table. But at least it will only do one temporary table instead of many.


These queries are complex enough. You shouldn't try to write a single SQL query that can give all of these results. Remember the classic quote from Brian Kernighan:

Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you’re as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank so much for such a complete answer. Things are faster now with indexes and inner join instead of subquery. What I have now is a table with fields year, quarter, total_sale (regarding to the pair (year,quarter)) and sale. What I want to gather is information regarding certain period: this quarter, quarters, year 2011... Info has to be splitted in top customers, ones with bigger sales, etc. Would it be possible to get the last purchase value from customers with total_purchases bigger than 5? I cannot without having all queries together and using ORDER BY total_sale LIMIT X, Y –  fedorqui Feb 22 '13 at 14:03
    
Again: thanks a lot, @Bill Karwin. Your solution has opened me a new world of options. Using indexes the queries became quite lighter and splitting results in different queries also helped a lot. –  fedorqui Feb 25 '13 at 9:35

I think you should try adding an index on sales(customer, date). The subquery is probably the performance bottleneck.

share|improve this answer
    
It was quite useful! Thanks –  fedorqui Feb 25 '13 at 9:36

You can make this puppy scream. Dump the whole inner join query. Really. This is a trick virtually no one seems to know about.

Assuming dates is a datetime, convert it to a sortable string, concatenate the values you want, max (or min), substring, cast. You may need to adjust the date convert function (this one works in MS-SQL), but this idea will work anywhere:

SELECT customer, count(sale), max_sale = cast(substring(max(convert(char(19), dates, 120) + str(sale, 12, 2)), 20, 12) as numeric(12, 2))
FROM sales a 
group by customer

Voilá. If you need more result columns, do:

SELECT yourkey
            , maxval = left(val, N1)                  --you often won't need this
            , result1 = substring(val, N1+1, N2)
            , result2 = substring(val, N1+N2+1, N3)   --etc. for more values
FROM ( SELECT yourkey, val = max(cast(maxval as char(N1))
                               + cast(resultCol1 as char(N2))
                               + cast(resultCol2 as char(N3)) )
       FROM yourtable GROUP BY yourkey ) t

Be sure that you have fixed lengths for all but the last field. This takes a little work to get your head around, but is very learnable and repeatable. It will work on any database engine, and even if you have rank functions, this will often significantly outperform them.

More on this very common challenge here.

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and if it's a wide or tall table, CREATE INDEX IX_sales1 ON sales (customer, dates) INCLUDE (sale) –  bwperrin Feb 21 '13 at 15:02
    
(nolock) is a Microsoft SQL Server thing. No such option exists in MySQL. –  Bill Karwin Feb 21 '13 at 15:09
    
thx - nolock reference removed. –  bwperrin Feb 21 '13 at 15:15
    
whoops forgot - instead of "str(sale, 12, 2)" you'll want "case when sale > 0 then str(sale, 12, 2) else null end" –  bwperrin Feb 21 '13 at 15:32
    
Neat trick but that's a pretty gnarly expression, and if you needed more than one column from the row with the max date, you'd have to craft another similar expression for each column, and cast it to the appropriate data type. Seems like a lot of fragile and hard to maintain code. –  Bill Karwin Feb 21 '13 at 15:40

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