Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have returned the pointee type from operator T*(), and invoked delete operator over smart pointer, and tried invoking the member function, and i have not got any run time error. How is that possible? Or is my understanding is wrong? Kindly suggest.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class sPtr
{
    private:
       T * pointee__;
     public:

        operator T * () {
                cout <<"Inside T* () "<<endl;
                return pointee__;
        };
    explicit sPtr ( T * t )
    {

      pointee__ = t;
    };
    T * operator->() {
        return pointee__;
     }
};

class JTest
{
 private:
        int x;
 public:
   JTest ( int l=100) { x=l; };
    void display ();
};

void JTest::display()
{
  cout <<"Display API x is "<<x<<endl;
}

void JFunc (JTest * tmp)
{
  cout <<" JFunc"<<endl;
  tmp->display ();
  cout <<"Invoking JTest -> display "<<endl;
}


int main ( int argc, char ** argv)
{
 sPtr <JTest> t(new JTest);
 t->display();
 delete t; // Invokes operator T* () , and it is dangerous!!!..
t->display  ();

}

OUTPUT:

Display API x is 100
Inside T* () 
Display API x is 100
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by WhozCraig, Kerrek SB, Useless, talonmies, Aadit M Shah Feb 21 '13 at 16:07

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
    
If your question is: "Why doesn't UB crash on me every time I invoke it", then the answer is: "Because its UB" –  PlasmaHH Feb 21 '13 at 14:16
    
You're doing something you're not allowed to do. There's no point asking about what to expect. –  Kerrek SB Feb 21 '13 at 14:22
1  
The sign said the speed limit was 30 mph. I tried, and I could go over 60 mph. How is that possible? I was expecting to get arrested. –  molbdnilo Feb 21 '13 at 14:34
1  
I think it's a reasonable question; it is clear and specific. The questioner saw unexpected behaviour and asked for an explanation. I would not have closed it, especially not for the reason stated. –  Watusimoto Feb 22 '13 at 9:23

1 Answer 1

Deleting t marks the memory pointed to by t as unused, but leaves the address stored in t intact. When you try to use the object stored at t, C++ does not check if it has been deleted, so while what you have will often crash, it may occasionally work if the memory used by the deleted object has not yet been overwritten by the system.

In short: sometimes this will work, often it will crash, and it is always a bad idea.

If you want to protect yourself from yourself, set t to NULL after you have deleted it.

share|improve this answer
2  
The best way to protect yourself from yourself is to not leave any deleted pointers exposed, i.e., make all uses of delete be with private data members and always inside destructors. Or better, forget about delete and follow the rule of zero. (IOW, if you have a concierge for each customer that always opens their room for them, people cannot steal hotel room keys) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 21 '13 at 14:26
    
Thanks Martinho. YOu helped with information, rather... ;). –  Whoami Feb 21 '13 at 16:36

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.