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In my .bashrc, I have a function called hello:

function hello() {
   echo "Hello, $1!"
}

I want to be able to invoke hello() from the shell as follows:

$ hello Lloyd

And get the output:

> Hello, Lloyd!

What's the trick?

(The real function I have in mind is more complicated, of course.)

EDIT: This is REALLY caused by a syntax error in the function, I think! :(

function coolness() {

    if[ [-z "$1"] -o [-z "$2"] ]; then
    	echo "Usage: $0 [sub_package] [endpoint]";
    	exit 1;
    fi
        echo "Hi!"
}
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You should be able to call functions defined in the .bashrc from the shell, since it should be sourced by your shell. Is yours not? –  Jefromi Sep 30 '09 at 20:40
    
Ah, you mean you want to call it from a script, not from the interactive shell? Might want to update your question to reflect this so others can find it. (The bashrc is not generally sourced for non-interactive shells.) –  Jefromi Sep 30 '09 at 20:42
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4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The test in your function won't work - you should not have brackets around the -z clauses, and there should be a space between if and the open bracket. It should read:

function coolness() {

    if [ -z "$1" -o -z "$2" ]; then
        echo "Usage: $0 [sub_package] [endpoint]";
        exit 1;
    fi
    echo "Hi!"
}
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this fixed the problem! thanks! –  les2 Sep 30 '09 at 21:13
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You can export functions. In your ~/.bashrc file after you define the function, add export -f functionname.

function hello() {
   echo "Hello, $1!"
}

export -f hello

Then the function will be available at the shell prompt and also in other scripts that you call from there.

Edit:

Brackets in Bash conditional statements are not brackets, they're commands. They have to have spaces around them. If you want to group conditions, use parentheses. Here's your function:

function coolness() {

    if [[ -z "$1" -o  -z "$2" ]]; then
        echo "Usage: $0 [sub_package] [endpoint]";
        exit 1;
    fi
        echo "Hi!"
}
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Include in your script the line

source .bashrc

try with the source construct it should work!

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2  
it's the if statement that won't behave! (i'm a beast at java, but bash beats the hell out of me) –  les2 Sep 30 '09 at 20:53
    
@les2 same crap I am facing. How did you solve yours ? –  Wildling Jan 21 '13 at 13:42
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$ source .bashrc
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