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Is it possible to pass a fully formed block (a block with all its parameters included) into a method to then have that block executed in the method?

At the moment I have this structure repeated in my project:

 if (//block exists)
        {
            if (self.returnOnMainThread)
            {
                dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^
                               {
                                   //call block here
                               });
            }
            else
            {
                //call block here
            }
        }

However ideally I'd like to abstract the above clunk of code out into a method similar to:

- (void) reportSuccessWithBlock:(GenericBlockType)block{
        if (block)
        {
            if (self.returnOnMainThread)
            {
                dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^
                               {
                                   block;
                               });
            }
            else
            {
                block;
            }
        }

}

EDIT:

The block's type wouldn't be known in advance.

So the call path could look like this

- (void) someMethod:(void (^)(NSArray *array))success
{
//Some code here setting up the array to be passed back

   [self reportSuccessWithBlock:success(array)];

}

There are a few assumptions in the above code (that I don't know are possible):

  1. Methods can accept generic block types
  2. A block can be passed with all its parameters present but without actually executing
share|improve this question
1  
When you say "The block itself can contain a number of different variables", do you mean the block can accept a differing number of parameters? –  trojanfoe Feb 21 '13 at 15:16
    
@trojanfoe What I mean is that this method should be able to accept blocks with differing signatures e.g. (void (^)(NSArray *array))success or (void (^)(NSDictionary *dictionary, NSUInteger value))success –  williamb Feb 21 '13 at 15:21
    
That will be a problem as you need to provide the parameters to the blocks and if you don't know what they will be, then how can you do that? It might be possible, but will be messy and doesn't sound like it's worth the effort. –  trojanfoe Feb 21 '13 at 15:22
    
@trojanfoe thanks, I wasn't sure if it was possible to accept a "generic" block type as a parameter –  williamb Feb 21 '13 at 15:30
    
You could do it by passing an NSArray of parameters, and that would work, but you'd have to re-work your block code. –  trojanfoe Feb 21 '13 at 15:35

2 Answers 2

If you have two different blocks as you said you do in the comments, you can merge the two as follows. However, this is quite hacky, and you will need to check the class of the object when the block is called.

- (void) reportSuccessWithBlock:(void (^) (id object, NSUInteger value)) block {

    if (!block)
        return;

    if (self.returnOnMainThread) {
        dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), block((id)someObject, value)); // return 0 instead if there is no value
    }

    else {
        block((id) someObject, value)); // return 0 instead if there is no value
    }
}

Therefore, when the block is called, all you would need to do is check the class and do whatever with the returned objects:

- (void) someMethod {

    [self reportSuccessWithBlock:^(id object, NSUInteger value) {

        if ([object isKindOfClass:[NSArray class]]) {

            // returned an NSArray and `value` is 0 (unset)

        }

        else if ([object isKindOfClass:[NSDictionary class]]) {

            // returned an NSDictionary and the `value` is not 0 (unset)

        }

        else {

            // something has gone wrong somewhere!

        }

    }];

}
share|improve this answer

OK, I think the idea of using NSArray parameters will work, so you can give your blocks the same signature:

typedef void ^(MYBLOCK)(NSArray *args);

And implementing your method as:

- (void)reportSuccessWithBlock:(GenericBlockType)block
                  andArguments:(NSArray *)args
{
    if (block != nil)
    {
       if (self.returnOnMainThread)
       {
            dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
                block(args);
            });
       }
       else
       {
           block(args);
       }
    }
}

And then it's just a case of making sure the right type of argument is given to the block in the right order (sounds trivial, but will cause all sorts of aggro if you get this wrong).

MYBLOCK block1 = ^(NSArray *args) {
    // I accept NSNumber, NSString, NSValue
    NSAssert(args.count == 3, @"Invalid argument count");
    NSNumber *arg1 = args[0];
    NSString *arg2 = args[1];
    NSValue *arg3 = args[2];

    // Do my thing
};

and calling it like:

[someClass reportSuccessWithBlock:block1
                     andArguments:@[ @(1), @"Hello", @(cgpoint) ]];
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is very useful, at least for me - read about 10 article about usage block as method's parameter and still have some question - read your answer - and fully undertand it. Thanks a lot, especially for this line : [someClass reportSuccessWithBlock:block1 andArguments:@[ @(1), @"Hello", @(cgpoint) ]]; –  Kirill Aug 1 '14 at 21:20

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