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is there any existing linq function or similiar functions to detect how often values in an ordered list changes from less than zero to greater than zero?

As example, values:

5
2
-2
-5
8  <--- First
6
2
0
1
-3
-5
-3
2  <--- Second

Total count: 2

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How 'bout zero? – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 15:05
    
"From less than zero to greater than zero"? You mean: from greater than zero to less than zero instead, or where does your list start? – Tim Schmelter Feb 21 '13 at 15:06
    
...and how about an initially negative number? – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 15:12
    
sorry, I've updated the list... it seems I'm already a little bit confused about it... lol – Felix C Feb 21 '13 at 15:13
    
So what about the list 1, -1, 0, 1 - that has no change or one change? – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 15:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Sure - it's certainly easy if you're using .NET 4 or higher, using Zip:

// TODO: Consider how you want to handle 0 itself
var count = list.Zip(list.Skip(1), (x, y) => new { x, y })
                .Count(pair => pair.x > 0 && pair.y < 0);

That shouldn't be hard to convert into VB if you know VB well :)

Alternatively, if you've really got a list, you can just do it "manually" pretty easily without LINQ:

int count = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < list.Count - 1; i++)
{
    if (list[i] > 0 && list[i + 1] < 0)
    {
        count++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Zip looks very interessting.. but it's also a bit complex so I think the "manually way" will be better here, specially for other developers reading my code. Converting to VB.NET isn't a problem, thanks – Felix C Feb 21 '13 at 15:15
    
your for loop will cause an exception, because in the if you are accessing list[i + 1], which is not available in the last step. – Felix C Feb 26 '13 at 8:42
    
@FelixC: It should be, given that my loop condition is i < list.Count - 1. – Jon Skeet Feb 26 '13 at 8:50
    
Ah, you're right.. i translated it to VB.NET and there is only <= available for the loop (For i As Integer = 0 To X) – Felix C Feb 26 '13 at 9:53

You can implement this in one pass using Aggregate:

seq.Aggregate(new { Count=0, LastN = 0}, (state, n) => new { 
        Count =  state.Count + (n > 0 && state.LastN < 0 ? 1 : 0), 
        LastN = n == 0 ? state.LastN : n
    }).Count

This takes into account your wish to include "gradual" transitions such as -1,0,1.

However, a foreach may be easier, simply because it's more conventional. It'll also be faster:

var count = 0;
var lastN = 0;
foreach(var n in seq) {
    if(n > 0 && lastN < 0)
        count++;
    if (n != 0)
        lastN = n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the C#; I'm not really well versed in VB. – Eamon Nerbonne Feb 21 '13 at 15:53
    
That is no problem, I know c# very well, but I'm forced to code in VB.NET here :D thanks for your answer – Felix C Feb 25 '13 at 13:22

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