Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been modifying a simple Java Swing console, and I decided to add a form of highlighting for keywords (by coloring the area next to flagged lines). I got it to work fine when I throw errors by searching for the keyword "Exception", but when I do a System.out.println with the keyword in it, it highlights everything. I think the string is somehow being combined with all of the strings already entered, which is the cause for this error, but I am having trouble fixing it.

Here's a screenshot:

enter image description here

The text "Hello World 2" and "Lets throw an error on this console" should not be highlighted.

// Edited by Jeff B
// A simple Java Console for your application (Swing version)
// Requires Java 1.1.5 or higher
//
// Disclaimer the use of this source is at your own risk. 
//
// Permision to use and distribute into your own applications
//
// RJHM van den Bergh , rvdb@comweb.nl

import java.io.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

class textAreaC extends JTextArea {
    int rowCount;
    int rowHeight;
    ArrayList<Point> exPoint = new ArrayList<Point>();

    public textAreaC() {
        rowHeight = this.getRowHeight();
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        super.paint(g);
        g.setColor(Color.red);
        for (int i = 0; i < exPoint.size(); i++) {
            g.fillRect(3, exPoint.get(i).x * rowHeight, 10, exPoint.get(i).y
                    * rowHeight);
        }
    }

    public void append(String str) {
        int rows = str.split("\r\n|\r|\n").length;
        if (str.contains("Exception")) {
            //System.out.println("This was the string: " + str + "It has " + rows + "rows" + " End String");
            exPoint.add(new Point(rowCount, rows));
        }
        rowCount += rows;
        super.append(str);

    }
}

public class Console extends WindowAdapter implements WindowListener,
        ActionListener, Runnable {
    private JFrame frame;
    private textAreaC textArea;
    private Thread reader;
    private Thread reader2;
    private boolean quit;

    private final PipedInputStream pin = new PipedInputStream();
    private final PipedInputStream pin2 = new PipedInputStream();

    Thread errorThrower; // just for testing (Throws an Exception at this Console

    public Console() {
        // create all components and add them
        frame = new JFrame("Java Console");
        Dimension screenSize = Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize();
        Dimension frameSize = new Dimension((int) (screenSize.width / 2),
                (int) (screenSize.height / 2));
        int x = (int) (frameSize.width / 2);
        int y = (int) (frameSize.height / 2);
        frame.setBounds(x, y, frameSize.width, frameSize.height);

        textArea = new textAreaC();
        textArea.setEditable(false);
        textArea.setMargin(new Insets(3, 20, 3, 3));
        JButton button = new JButton("clear");
        frame.getContentPane().setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        frame.getContentPane().add(new JScrollPane(textArea),
                BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.getContentPane().add(button, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        frame.setVisible(true);
        frame.addWindowListener(this);
        button.addActionListener(this);

        try {
            PipedOutputStream pout = new PipedOutputStream(this.pin);
            System.setOut(new PrintStream(pout, true));
        } catch (java.io.IOException io) {
            textArea.append("Couldn't redirect STDOUT to this console\n"
                    + io.getMessage());
        } catch (SecurityException se) {
            textArea.append("Couldn't redirect STDOUT to this console\n"
                    + se.getMessage());
        }

        try {
            PipedOutputStream pout2 = new PipedOutputStream(this.pin2);
            System.setErr(new PrintStream(pout2, true));
        } catch (java.io.IOException io) {
            textArea.append("Couldn't redirect STDERR to this console\n"
                    + io.getMessage());
        } catch (SecurityException se) {
            textArea.append("Couldn't redirect STDERR to this console\n"
                    + se.getMessage());
        }

        quit = false; // signals the Threads that they should exit

        // Starting two seperate threads to read from the PipedInputStreams             
        //
        reader = new Thread(this);
        reader.setDaemon(true);
        reader.start();
        //
        reader2 = new Thread(this);
        reader2.setDaemon(true);
        reader2.start();

        // testing part
        // you may omit this part for your application
        // 
        //System.out.println("Test me please Exception\n testing 123");
        System.out.flush();
        System.out.println("Hello World 2");

        System.out.println("\nLets throw an error on this console");
        errorThrower = new Thread(this);
        errorThrower.setDaemon(true);
        errorThrower.start();
    }

    public synchronized void windowClosed(WindowEvent evt) {
        quit = true;
        this.notifyAll(); // stop all threads
        try {
            reader.join(1000);
            pin.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
        try {
            reader2.join(1000);
            pin2.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }
        System.exit(0);
    }

    public synchronized void windowClosing(WindowEvent evt) {
        frame.setVisible(false); // default behaviour of JFrame 
        frame.dispose();
    }

    public synchronized void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
        textArea.setText("");
    }

    public synchronized void run() {
        try {
            while (Thread.currentThread() == reader) {
                try {
                    this.wait(100);
                } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                }
                if (pin.available() != 0) {
                    String input = this.readLine(pin);
                    textArea.append(input);
                    //System.out.println(input.split("\r\n|\r|\n").length);
                }
                if (quit)
                    return;
            }

            while (Thread.currentThread() == reader2) {
                try {
                    this.wait(100);
                } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
                }
                if (pin2.available() != 0) {
                    String input = this.readLine(pin2);
                    textArea.append(input);
                }
                if (quit)
                    return;
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            textArea.append("\nConsole reports an Internal error.");
            textArea.append("The error is: " + e);
        }

        // just for testing (Throw a Nullpointer after 1 second)
        if (Thread.currentThread() == errorThrower) {
            try {
                this.wait(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            }
            throw new NullPointerException(
                    "Application test: throwing an NullPointerException It should arrive at the console");
        }
    }

    public synchronized String readLine(PipedInputStream in) throws IOException {
        String input = "";
        do {
            int available = in.available();
            if (available == 0)
                break;
            byte b[] = new byte[available];
            in.read(b);
            input = input + new String(b, 0, b.length);
        } while (!input.endsWith("\n") && !input.endsWith("\r\n") && !quit);
        return input;
    }

    public static void main(String[] arg) {
        new Console(); // create console with not reference 
    }
}

I have been doing a little testing, take a look at this printout: enter image description here

To replicate this, add a System.out.prinln statement in reader(1) and append the input to the end of the string. This is what my prinlns look like:

System.out.println("There should be a string before me.");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Test me please Exception");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Test print 2");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Test print 3");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Test me please Exception 2");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Exception here lololol");
System.out.flush();
System.out.println("Hello World 2");
System.out.flush();

And my reader one looks like this:

if (pin.available()!=0)
    {

        String input=this.readLine(pin);
        System.out.println("this was printed by the thread second " + input);
        textArea.append(input);
        //System.out.println(input.split("\r\n|\r|\n").length);
    }
if (quit) return;

It is treating all of those prinlns as a single input, is this something java is doing, or am I missing something?

share|improve this question
    
You should add screenshots illustrating the undesirable behavior. Most folks won't be willing to run your code just to see what you are describing with words. –  Perception Feb 21 '13 at 15:41
    
Will do, thanks –  Jeff B Feb 21 '13 at 15:44
    
The problem is in how often the append() method is invoked. Multiple System.out.println() invocations are being combined into one call to the append() method. This even happens even when I add a flush() after every call. I'm not sure how to force each println() call to equate to an append() call. –  camickr Feb 21 '13 at 17:00
    
Another approach can be highlight the text differently depending on whether the output was generated by System.out or System.err. See MessageConsole for this type of approach. I tried using the message console for your current requirement but still had problems. Each println() was recognized correctly, but the output from the Exception was considered 3 lines, not 1. Since each line doesn't contain the word "exception" it was not highlight correctly. –  camickr Feb 21 '13 at 17:07
    
@camickr Thanks, I would like to get what I have working though, as with that method, you can only sort out two different types of inputs. Using a keyword method, I could have an undefined number of keywords and different highlights for them. –  Jeff B Feb 21 '13 at 19:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use HTML for output, that is easier. Just as first text <html> would do (very loose HTML). Or set the content type. Append lines with <br> and so on.

It is more flexible.


You did two appends of multiline strings. Taking the number of rows would make all lines in the string red. Maybe this suboptimal version is more like what you intended.

@Override
public void append(String str) {
    String[] lines = str.split("\r\n|\r|\n");
    int rows = lines.length;
    for (String line : lines) {
        super.append(line + "\n");
        if (line.contains("Exception")) {
            exPoint.add(new Point(rowCount, 1)); // 1 line
        }
        ++rowCount;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I believe that requires use of JEditorPane, not JTextArea correct? (I was using JEditorPane before, but was having issues getting it to play nice with multiple threads) –  Jeff B Feb 21 '13 at 16:11
    
You are right: JEditorPane or JTextPane. About being careful for multiple threads too. Should be doable though. –  Joop Eggen Feb 21 '13 at 16:24
    
The requirement is paint a bar down the left, not hightlight the text. Working with dynamic HTML is not easier than working with plain text in this case. –  camickr Feb 21 '13 at 17:02
    
Thanks Joop, if I switch it, just the first line is highlighted, no matter where the "Exception" key word (this is because it treats everything sent through System.out as a single string, but why does it do this?) It seems that anything sent through Exceptions are treated as separate strings. When you say "sub-optimal" what do you mean? –  Jeff B Feb 22 '13 at 3:15
    
If the first line highlights, then that should mean, you do not increase rowCount by 1 in the for loop. Suboptimal because now there is line wise appending and Point.y superfluous, just could use integer list. –  Joop Eggen Feb 22 '13 at 8:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.