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I have an object defined outside the function, in a global scope. This object is not passed into the function as an argument, but the function does modify it and return the modified object.

What I wanted to know is, if the function returns a copy of the object, or the original global object?

Also, will passing that object to the function as an argument, make a difference, since objects are passed into functions by reference?

share|improve this question
    
Objects are never copied, only if you do so explicitly. – Felix Kling Feb 21 '13 at 15:43
5  
Rather than saying "objects are passed into functions by reference", it's more accurate to say that the reference to the object is passed by value. See here: stackoverflow.com/questions/518000/… – Tim Goodman Feb 21 '13 at 15:46
up vote 29 down vote accepted

Whenever you're returning an object, you're returning a reference to the object. Likewise, when you're passing an object, you're passing a reference. However, passing an object in as an argument can be different than just changing an object in global scope, as these examples show. This is because the reference to the object is itself passed by value.

If you're changing the members of an object, then whether you pass it in as an argument or just update the global object makes no difference. Either way, you're working with the same object.

Example 1:

var object = {foo:'original'};

function changeObject() {
    object.foo = 'changed';
    return object;
}

console.log(changeObject()); // outputs {foo:'changed'}
console.log(object); // outputs {foo:'changed'}

Example 2:

var object = {foo:'original'};

function changeArgument(object) {
    object.foo = 'changed';
    return object;
}

console.log(changeArgument(object));  // outputs {foo:'changed'}
console.log(object);  // outputs {foo:'changed'}

On the other hand, if you're overwriting the object with a new object, the change won't persist if you do it to the argument, but will persist if you do it to the global object. That's because the argument passes the reference to the object by value. Once you replace this value with a reference to a new object, you're not talking about the same object anymore.

Example 3:

var object = {foo:'original'};

function replaceObject() {
    object = {foo:'changed'};
    return object;
}

console.log(replaceObject()); // outputs {foo:'changed'}
console.log(object); // outputs {foo:'changed'}

Example 4:

var object = {foo:'original'};

function replaceArgument(object) {
    object = {foo:'changed'};
    return object;
}

console.log(replaceArgument(object)); // outputs {foo:'changed'}
console.log(object); // outputs {foo:'original'}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course if you wanted replaceArgument(object) to have the same end result as replaceObject, you could just do object = replaceArgument(object) – Tim Goodman Feb 21 '13 at 16:06
3  
This is a great answer. – rgthree Feb 21 '13 at 17:09

From your question this is how I think your code looks (more or less):

var o = {};

function f() {
    o.prop = true;
    return o;
}
  1. In this case the global variable o references an object.
  2. When you modify o you're modify whatever o references. Hence it modifies the original object.
  3. When you return o you're returning a reference to the original object.

Passing the object to a function results in the reference to the original object being passed. Hence any modifications will affect the original object. For example:

var o = {};

f(o);

console.log(o.prop); // true

function f(o) {
    o.prop = true;
}
share|improve this answer

What I wanted to know is, if the function returns a copy of the object, or the original global object?

Effectively, you only ever deal with references to objects in JavaScript. Even var foo = {} just assigns a reference to a new object to foo.

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If the object is outside the function, you don't need to 'return' it. If you modify the object within the function it will update the object itself. Then you can reference the newly updated object in other functions as needed.

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That makes sense. However, in my case, returning it helps isolate that single object from a huge collection, so that I don't need to perform a look up for that object again. – Hammad Akhwand Feb 21 '13 at 15:52
    
Hmm. Not sure I understand your situation then. Can you post a code example? – LoneWolfPR Feb 21 '13 at 16:00

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