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I have a table with 2 columns (A as bool and B as text), these columns can be:

  1. both are null
  2. if A is False, then B should be null
  3. if A is True, then B should be not null

There are rules. I want to create a stored procedure or function to check these rules when row adding or updating (via trigger). What is better, stored procedure or function? If function, which type? In general, which variant is the best (return boolean or other way etc)?

share|improve this question
    
Why not use a trigger? –  Kermit Feb 21 '13 at 16:21
    
how to write trigger here? –  Oleg Sh Feb 21 '13 at 16:24
1  
Read the manual. –  Kermit Feb 21 '13 at 16:25
    
You can alter my example. to pass in A and B (values) to the UDF. And write your mini rule there. The trade off is performance, the UDF hit will slow down the insert or update a tad. If you're only inserting 100 rows, no big deal. If you're inserting a million rows per day, then ... ummmm, maybe not. –  granadaCoder Feb 21 '13 at 16:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think you're after a CHECK Constraint.

Example:

ALTER TABLE Xxx
  ADD CONSTRAINT chk_Xxx 
  CHECK ( (A IS NULL AND B IS NULL) 
       OR (A = 0 AND B IS NULL) 
       OR (A = 1 AND B IS NOT NULL)
        ) ;
share|improve this answer
    
I upvoted as well. For this situation, this is probably the best answer. My answer is a "possibility" if the logic becomes too complex for an "in-line" solution like this one. –  granadaCoder Feb 21 '13 at 20:37

I would use a CHECK CONSTRAINT wired up to a UDF.
Here is a silly example verifying that if you insert a Person, their age will be greater than 17.

if NOT exists (select *  from sysobjects 
    where id = object_id('dbo.udfOlderThan17Check') and sysstat & 0xf = 0)
    BEGIN
        print 'Creating the stubbed version of dbo.udfOlderThan17Check'
        EXEC ( 'CREATE FUNCTION dbo.udfOlderThan17Check ( @j as smallint ) RETURNS bit AS BEGIN RETURN 0 END')
    END
GO


ALTER FUNCTION dbo.udfOlderThan17Check ( @Age smallint  )
    RETURNS bit AS
    BEGIN
        declare @exists int

        select @exists = 0

        if ( @Age IS NULL )
            BEGIN
                select @exists = 1 -- NULL VALUES SHOULD NOT BLOW UP THE CONSTRAINT CHECK   
            END

        if ( @exists = 0 )

        BEGIN

            if @Age > 17
                begin
                    select @exists = 1
                end     

            END

        return @exists
    END



GO



IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'[dbo].[Person]') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsUserTable') = 1)
    BEGIN
        DROP TABLE [dbo].[Person]
    END
GO


CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Person]
(
      PersonUUID [UNIQUEIDENTIFIER] NOT NULL DEFAULT NEWSEQUENTIALID()
    , Age smallint not null
)

GO


ALTER TABLE dbo.Person ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Person
PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED (PersonUUID)
GO


ALTER TABLE dbo.Person
ADD CONSTRAINT [CK_Person_AgeValue] CHECK ([dbo].[udfOlderThan17Check]( [Age] ) != 0)
GO

Here are some "tests":

INSERT INTO dbo.Person (Age) values (33)
INSERT INTO dbo.Person (Age) values (16)

INSERT INTO dbo.Person (Age) select 333 UNION select 58
INSERT INTO dbo.Person (Age) select 444 UNION select 4

select * from dbo.Person
share|improve this answer
1  
Check constraint is probably the way to go for this since a UDF is not going to be very efficient for checking something like this on a large data set –  JNK Feb 21 '13 at 16:30
    
I agree that CHECK is the most likely candidate. Keep in mind, my sample IS a check contraint, but also uses a UDF. But the UDF allows some "advanced" checking if that is required, so I offered this as an option. If he can get by with a normal CHECK, than that would be the way to go. –  granadaCoder Feb 21 '13 at 16:33
    
Having read the question a little better my example is kinda pointless :) and this captures it better... –  chrisb Feb 21 '13 at 16:41
    
@granadaCoder Sorry, I didn't scroll all the way through the original code. –  JNK Feb 21 '13 at 17:04
3  
NO NO NO. Do not use UDFs in check constraints. Just don't. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 21 '13 at 17:20

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