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I'm using Scanner and a Delimiter to tokenize my .txt file (it's a homework that I've got to do). First version of the file looks like this:

5,5,5,6,5,8,9,5,6,8, good, very good, excellent, good
7,7,8,7,6,7,8,8,9,7,very good, Good, excellent, very good
8,7,6,7,8,7,5,6,8,7 ,GOOD, VERY GOOD, GOOD, AVERAGE
9,9,9,8,9,7,9,8,9,9 ,Excellent, very good, very good, excellent
7,8,8,7,8,7,8,9,6,8 ,very good, good, excellent, excellent
6,5,6,4,5,6,5,6,6,6 ,good, average, good, good
7,8,7,7,6,8,7,8,6,6 ,good, very good, good,  very good
5,7,6,7,6,7,6,7,7,7  ,excellent, very good, very good, very good

And I've used useDelimiter("[ ]*(,)[ ]*") second version of the file looks like this:

5 5 5 6 5 8 9 5 6 8 good, very good, excellent, good
7 7 8 7 6 7 8 8 9 7 very good, Good, excellent, very good
8 7 6 7 8 7  5 6 8 7 GOOD, VERY GOOD, GOOD, AVERAGE
9 9 9 8 9 7 9  8 9 9 Excellent, very good, very good, excellent
7 8 8 7 8 7 8 9 6 8 very good, good, excellent, excellent
6 5 6 4 5 6 5 6 6 6 good, average, good, good
7  8 7 7 6 8 7 8 6 6 good, very good, good,  very good
5 7 6 7 6 7 6 7 7 7  excellent, very good, very good, very good

And I can't come up with a regexp which would help me to separate numbers by space and words by comma. Esentially I need an array with 14 values (very good being a single variable)

Note there are multiple spaces (this is done on purpose to make it harder for us).

So any sort of help would be appreciated.

P.S. We're only allowed to use Delimiters only (no splits etc..)

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There are 'space' (\s) and 'word' (\w) and 'digit' (\d) and 'word boundary' (\b) character classes for regex that might help you. –  Nick Russell Feb 21 '13 at 16:40
    
Do you want a comma between the final number and the first word? –  nattyddubbs Feb 21 '13 at 16:44
    
I don't need to add anything to the file, I simply need to extract the values and put them into a multidimensional array in this case it would be int [8][14], the words will be replaced with appropriate numbers. –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should work, the key is the positive-lookbehind ((<?=)) and alternation (|):

String input = "9 9 9 8 9 7 9  8 9 9 Excellent, very good, very good, excellent";
Scanner s = new Scanner(input).useDelimiter("(?<=\\d)[\\s,]+|\\s*,\\s*");
while (s.hasNext()) {
    System.out.println("Token: ." + s.next() + ".");
}

Prints:

Token: .9.
Token: .9.
Token: .9.
Token: .8.
Token: .9.
Token: .7.
Token: .9.
Token: .8.
Token: .9.
Token: .9.
Token: .Excellent.
Token: .very good.
Token: .very good.
Token: .excellent.
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Perfect, thanks a lot. –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 17:25

You can try this one (((?<=[0-9]+)\s*(?=[0-9]+))|(,\s*(?=[a-zA-Z]+))|((?<=[0-9]+)\s*(?=[a-zA-Z]+))), looks awful but should work

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Firstly, that is wrong. I guess you mean (\s*,\s*)|(\s+). But that doesn't work either. It would separate very good into two tokens. –  Alderath Feb 21 '13 at 16:41
    
Numbers seem to be okay, but the strings only contain 1 letter each. –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 16:45
    
updated initial variant, this should achieve the goal –  Alexey A. Feb 21 '13 at 17:15
    
Works perfectly but if he ever asked me to explain it I wouldn't know where to start hehe :) –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 17:17
    
Indeed, so dies the | (alternation) works sort of like an "OR" condition? –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 17:26

Note that Scanner allows you to change the delimiter at any time. If you can rely on your input text always having 10 numbers at the beginning and 4 word groups at the end, then you can simply start with a delimiter that just splits on spaces (\s+) and after 10 calls to nextInt(), switch to a delimiter that splits on a comma and spaces (\s*,\s*).

Something like:

String input = "5 5 5 6 5 8 9 5 6 8 good, very good, excellent, good";
Scanner scanner = new Scanner(input).useDelimiter("\\s+");
int[] results = new int[14];
for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
    results[i] = scanner.nextInt();
}
scanner.useDelimiter("\\s*,\\s*");
scanner.skip("\\s*");
for (int i = 10; i < 14; ++i) {
    String wordPhrase = scanner.next();
    int wordValue;
    if ("average".equalsIgnoreCase(wordPhrase))
        wordValue = 1;
    else if ("good".equalsIgnoreCase(wordPhrase))
        wordValue = 2;
    else if ("very good".equalsIgnoreCase(wordPhrase))
        wordValue = 3;
    else if ("excellent".equalsIgnoreCase(wordPhrase))
        wordValue = 4;
    else
        wordValue = 0;
    results[i] = wordValue;
}

It's also possible to do this with a single delimiter regex using zero-width lookaround assertions, but this is probably a bit advanced for a simple homework problem.

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Thank you for suggestion, why didn't I thought of that before :) I've got an issue tho, 10th index always seems to be 0. –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 17:16
    
Ah whoops, I guess when you switch the delimiter, the Scanner doesn't consume the space(s) between the last number and the first word, so it gets something like "` good" for the first word phrase. I updated the answer to tell the Scanner` to skip over spaces after changing the delimiter. –  matts Feb 21 '13 at 17:26
String[] str = expression.split("(,\\s+)|(\\s+)");

Try this:

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Again very good is split into separate tokens where it supposed to be a single one. –  Deividas Sutkus Feb 21 '13 at 16:47

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