Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an Array of partial hex values that get random letters appended to them forming a full hex value.

These are then randomly applied to div layers effectively shading them different colors. However what I get currently is a "Matisse" effect instead of variations of one color.

If you force var color = setHex(); to var color = '#CC0'; in the getRandomColor function you will see the effect I am after.

I want to know why the "Matisse" effect is happening when I should only be passing one hex value. How do I stop this?

See example here: http://jsfiddle.net/fyQhg/

// Set Hex

function setHex() {

var hexArray = ['#CC0','#FF9','#339'];
var randomHex = hexArray[Math.floor(Math.random() * hexArray.length)];

document.getElementById('inner').innerHTML = randomHex;

return randomHex;

}

// random color
function getRandomColor() {
var letters = '0123456789ABCDEF'.split('');

var color = setHex();
for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
    color += letters[Math.round(Math.random() * 7)];
}
return color;
}

//ditribute random colors
function buttonClick() {

var i,j, colorblock = document.getElementsByClassName('shade');
    for (i=0, j=colorblock.length; i<j; i++) {
            colorblock[i].style.background = getRandomColor();
        }   
    }

    window.onload = buttonClick();
share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity, why do you use 7 in the Math.random() * 7 inside getRandomColor()? – Anthony Clark Feb 21 '13 at 17:01
    
Hi Anthony, it provided me control over the color. I didn't want too much variation. Happy to know how I could do that better. – Dan Lee Feb 21 '13 at 23:28
    
Ah I see, I was just curious of it's significance - wasn't sure if I'd missed something. Nothing wrong with it! – Anthony Clark Feb 21 '13 at 23:44
up vote 3 down vote accepted
var base = setHex();
// random color
function getRandomColor() {
    var letters = '0123456789ABCDEF'.split('');
    var color = base;   

    for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
            color += letters[Math.round(Math.random() * 7)];
    }

    return color;
}

Declaring the base outside of the method works. Example


Explaination

In this method:

for (i=0, j=colorblock.length; i<j; i++) {
    colorblock[i].style.background = getRandomColor();
}

You are calling getRandomColor() repeatedly in that loop. Therefore you are also calling setHex() repeatedly which is creating a new random color each time the loop loops.

So by moving setHex() outside the method that is inside that loop into base you are effectively only calling setHex() once per load.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes so much sense now! Thank you so much! – Dan Lee Feb 21 '13 at 23:30

Why? Because function getRandomColor() calls setHex() which returns something else every time.

How to stop?

var color = setHex();
for (i=0, j=colorblock.length; i<j; i++) {
        colorblock[i].style.background = getRandomColor(color);
    }   
}

and

function getRandomColor(color) {
    var letters = '0123456789ABCDEF'.split('');

    for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
        color += letters[Math.round(Math.random() * 7)];
    }
    return color;
}
share|improve this answer

Every time you call getRandomColor you are calling setHex and picking another random base color. Just set the base color once, store it in a variable and use it.

For example:

var hexBase;

function setHex() {
    var hexArray = ['#CC0','#FF9','#339'];
    if (!hexBase) {
         hexBase = hexArray[Math.floor(Math.random() * hexArray.length)];
    }
    return hexBase; 
} 

Fiddle

It seems you were close to this solution because you were storing the result of setHex in a div, but you never checked it again. Also, you shouldn't need to store things in the DOM when you can just store them in JavaScript.

Finally, if you want to avoid the global variable, you can wrap the whole thing in a function (e.g. your onload function or a IIFE).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.