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Is it possible to optimise the function:

MD5_Update(&ctx_d, buf, num);

if you know that buf contains only zeros?

Or is this mathematically impossible?

Likewise for SHA1.

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2  
You might be able to optimize the first "iteration" of many iterations in the block hashing step of both algorithms. But aside from that, the intentional lack of mathematical properties make this (intentionally) difficult/impossible to do. –  Mysticial Feb 21 '13 at 17:42
    
What is your goal? Why do you care about this? Can you use precalculation (i.e. it's the beginning of the message that's zero)? –  CodesInChaos Feb 21 '13 at 18:03
    
Off-topic: @Mysticial you might be interested in the password hashing competition which needs constructions that exploit standard hardware (CPU+RAM) as well as possible while being unfriendly to other hardware (GPU/FPGA/ASIC), so an important part is designing and implementing high performance constructions. –  CodesInChaos Feb 21 '13 at 18:12
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If you control the input of the hash function then you could use a simple count instead of all the zero's, maybe using some kind of escape. E.g. 000020 in hex could mean 32 zero's. A (very) basic compression function may be much faster than MD5 or SHA1. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 21 '13 at 23:11
    
@owlstead - great idea - if you submit this as an answer, I'll accept it. –  chrisdew Feb 22 '13 at 10:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you control the input of the hash function then you could use a simple count instead of all the zero's, maybe using some kind of escape. E.g. 000020 in hex could mean 32 zero's. A (very) basic compression function may be much faster than MD5 or SHA1.

Obviously this solution will only be faster if you save one or more blocks of hash calculations. E.g. it does not matter if you hash 3 bytes or 16 bytes, as the input will be padded and expanded by the hash function before it is used.

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Posted the solution as asked, but I added a "caveat emptor" regarding the use of it. Hopefully you will still find it useful. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 22 '13 at 12:05
    
I'm updating a hash with 4K blocks, of which a significant minority are all zeros, so that's fine. I may just update the hash with a single zero byte, each time the code sees an 'empty' 4K block. –  chrisdew Feb 22 '13 at 12:19
    
Thanks, that increased performance on zero blocks from 90M/s to 500M/s. –  chrisdew Feb 23 '13 at 7:08

Cryptographic hashes are actually supposed to produce significant changes in output for small changes in input, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avalanche_effect . It sounds like you're looking for some relationship between some hashed data, and some hashed data pre-padded with zeros. By design this change in your input should produce output that isn't clearly related.

EDIT: To answer your question directly, by design "a small change in either the key or the plaintext should cause a drastic change in the ciphertext" which means it's meant to be mathematically difficult to do.

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You'd probably get some speedup, but it'd be relatively minor. The most important thing for high performance hashing is choosing an optimized implementation, and to use GPUs(or even FPGA/ASIC) to exploit parallelism if that's possible.

There is a known speedup for SHA-1 with fixed IV and messages that differ only a little. That speedup is around 21%. See New attack makes some password cracking faster - Ars Technica.

You might get a similar speedup when you have a completely fixed message but a variable IV. But it'd be a lot of work to implement this, especially as a non expert. Buying additional hardware is probably much cheaper than speeding up your code a few percent.


If the beginning of your message consists of multiple constant blocks, you can hash them once, and cache the intermediate state of the hashfunction. Might or might not be applicable to your situation.

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Neither SHA1 nor MD5 is parallelizable. –  Mysticial Feb 21 '13 at 17:59
    
@Mysticial Not internally/when working on a single stream. But many applications where hashing performance matters have multiple messages they can work on at the same time. For example calculating MACs for different packets at the same time, or validating multiple password guesses at the same time. –  CodesInChaos Feb 21 '13 at 18:00
    
@Mysticial if you can control the kind of algorithm used you could use some kind of tree hashing –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 21 '13 at 20:46
    
@owlstead virtsync.com uses hash trees. –  chrisdew Sep 5 '13 at 14:13

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