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I'm curious about how PHP handles conditional statements / order of operations with nesting. If I use the following if condition:

if(x == (1 || 2))
{
    // do something
}

I would expect it to behave the same as

if(x == 1 || x == 2)
{
    // do something
}

...but it doesn't. My first example seems like it would be a handy shorthand that makes pretty good sense, but it doesn't do what I expect. Can anyone shed some light on the issue? What exactly does PHP do with my first statement?

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2  
(1 || 2) evaluates to true –  Antony Feb 21 '13 at 17:19
    
That was one of the thoughts I had...so it just short-circuits and ignores x == and returns true every time? –  MuffinTheMan Feb 21 '13 at 17:20
    
no it's not ignoring ==, but it does comparison in brackets first! –  Elen Feb 21 '13 at 17:28
    
So just so I can be sure I'm understanding this, x is not a boolean variable, but it is true because it's non-zero? So if x were 0, then my expression would return false instead of true? –  MuffinTheMan Feb 21 '13 at 18:14
    
yes, exactly false != true –  Elen Feb 22 '13 at 11:49

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So for this piece of code:

if ($x == ( 1 || 2)) 
{
    // do something
}

In PHP, any non-zero number is considered true. Disclaimer: This fact isn't necessarily true in other languages. So in PHP, 0 is the only number considered false. So you're asking if $x == true in the above piece of code.

Hence, whenever $x is any number other than 0 the statement inside the if will resolve as true. However, when $x = 0 then that is equivalent to saying false == true which of course will resolve as false.

This article might help: PHP: Booleans

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Thanks for the clear answer. I got myself mixed up about a couple basics, but you hit the point about PHP considering all non-zero numbers as true, which is something I wasn't aware of. –  MuffinTheMan Feb 22 '13 at 16:12
1  
Just to follow up with this, you should remember that PHP is built ontop of C, so behaviours like this (non-zero numbers being true) tend to be inherited from its C base. –  Nick Mitchinson Feb 22 '13 at 18:00

Your shorthand is logically invalid. In almost every case you'll have to write out the full logical cases for all possibilities you want to test for.

I say 'almost' because in PHP you can do something ridiculous like:

if( in_array($x, array(1,2)) ) {
  // code!
}
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haha - that's a nice example =) –  Elen Feb 21 '13 at 17:31
    
@Elen my brain is now full of 'Stupid PHP Array Tricks' to make simple logic statements needlessly complex. –  Sammitch Feb 21 '13 at 17:32
    
+1 for array trick i really like array ... or stupid array :P –  NullPoiиteя Feb 21 '13 at 17:34
    
also in_array is faster than or condition codepad.viper-7.com/nWD7TP in worst case[ (one || tow || three ) if three] –  NullPoiиteя Feb 21 '13 at 17:40
    
@NullPointer wow... that's kind of sad. –  Sammitch Feb 21 '13 at 17:42
x == (1 || 2) 

evaluates like this:

(1 (if its false) then testing for 2, if not, the expression returns true)

now it will become:

if(x==true)?

Another example taken from (PHP.NET):

// foo() will never get called as those operators are short-circuit

$b = (true  || foo()); 
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The same with $b = (false && foo());, but this format is odd. I'd prefer if(false && foo()) to demonstrate that foo() would never be executed. –  Sammitch Feb 21 '13 at 17:24

See here about the precedence of an operator http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.precedence.php

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It will behave the same as math (think BEDMAS), with the brackets being executed first. So your example is behaving as:

if (x == ( 1 || 2)) {
  //code
}

and because 1 and 2 are both non-zero values (thus both true), you get:

if (x == true) {
  //code
}

Unfortunately to get what you want you'll need:

if (x == 1 || x == 2) {
  //code
}
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how would it make sense? you are asking the computer to execute the following logical expression:

if x == (1 || 2) which is same as x == (the result of 1 || 2)

so your expression would be x == true since 1 || 2 would return true

computers do whatever you tell them to do

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if(x == (1 || 2))
{
    // do something
}

OR and AND operations come back with TRUE or FALSE you statement says - if x equals (true) - as 1 or 2 will always be true - this just doesn't make sense...

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In first if evaluate result of 1||2 and check that it equal to x

In second its like this or this or this

however in first you can see that var_dump(1 || 2) returns every time true so

 $x = 3;
 var_dump($x == 1 || 2);
 if($x == 1 || 2){
     echo 'inside if';
  }

is also true so it will print inside if even $x is 3

so imo second way is way to go

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