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If I have a simple 2-D matrix with normalized values on x-axis between 0 and 1 and y-axys between 0 and 1, and I have 3 points in this matrix e.g. P1 (x=0.2,y=0.9), P2 (x=0.5,y=0.1) and P3 (x=0.9,y=0.4).

How can I simply calculate a curve thru this points, meaning having a function which is giving me the y for any x.

I now that there are any number of possible curves thru 3 points. But hey, you know what I mean: I want a smooth curve thru it, usable for audio-sample-interpolation, usable for calculation a volume-fade-curve, usable for calculating a monster-walking-path in a game.

Now I have searched the net for this question about 3 days, and I cannot believe that there is no usable solution for this task. All the text dealing about Catmull-rom-Splines, bezier-curves and all that theroretical stuff has all at least one point which doesn't make it for me usable. For example Catmull-Rom-splines need to have a fix distance between the control-points (I would use this code and set the 4. point-y to the 3. point y) :

void CatmullRomSpline(float *x,float *y,float x1,float y1,float x2,float y2,float x3,float y3,float x4,float y4,float u)
{
//x,y are calculated for x1,y1,x2,y2,x3,y3 and x4,y4 if u is the normalized distance (0-1) in relation to the distance between x2 and x3 for my whiched point

float u3,u2,f1,f2,f3,f4;

u3=u*u*u;
u2=u*u;
f1=-0.5f * u3 + u2 -0.5f *u;
f2= 1.5f * u3 -2.5f * u2+1.0f;
f3=-1.5f * u3 +2.0f * u2+0.5f*u;
f4=0.5f*u3-0.5f*u2;

*x=x1*f1+x2*f2+x3*f3+x4*f4;
*y=y1*f1+y2*f2+y3*f3+y4*f4;

}

But I don't see that x1 to x4 have any affect on the calculation of y, so I think x1 to x4 must have the same distance?

...

Or bezier-code doesn't calcuate the curve thru the points. The points (at least the 2. point) seem only to have a force-effect on the line.

typedef struct Point2D
{
double x;
double y;
} Point2D;

class bezier
{
std::vector<Point2D> points;
bezier();
void PushPoint2D( Point2D point );
Point2D GetPoint( double time );
~bezier();
};

void bezier::PushPoint2D(Point2D point)
{
points.push_back(point);
}

Point2D bezier::GetPoint( double x )
{
int i;
Point2D p;

p.x=0;
p.y=0;

if( points.size() == 1 ) return points[0];
if( points.size() == 0 ) return p;

bezier b;
for (i=0;i<(int)points.size()-1;i++)
{
    p.x = ( points[i+1].x - points[i].x ) * x + points[i].x;
    p.y = ( points[i+1].y - points[i].y ) * x + points[i].y;
    if (points.size()<=2) return p;
    b.PushPoint2D(p);
}

return b.GetPoint(x);
}

double GetLogicalYAtX(double x)
{
bezier bz;
Point2D p;

p.x=0.2;
p.y=0.9;
bz.PushPoint2D(p);

p.x=0.5;
p.y=0.1;
bz.PushPoint2D(p);

p.x=0.9;
p.y=0.4;
bz.PushPoint2D(p);

p=bz.GetPoint(x);

return p.y;
}

This is better than nothing, but it is 1. very slow (recursive) and 2. as I said doesn't really calculate the line thru the 2. point.

Is there a mathematical brain outside which could help me?

share|improve this question
    
stackoverflow.com/q/6711707/1458030 –  qPCR4vir Feb 21 '13 at 18:45

2 Answers 2

Thank you TOCS (Scott) for providing your code, I will also try it if I have some time. But what I have tested now is the hint by INFACT (answer 3): This "Largrange polynomials" are very very close to what I am searching for:

I have renamed my class bezier to curve, because I have added some code for lagrangeinterpolation. I also have added 3 pictures of graphical presentation what the code is calculation.

In Picture 1 you can see the loose middle point of the old bezier-function.

In Picture 2 you can now see the going thru all-points-result of lagrange interpolation.

In Picture 3 you can see the only problem, or should I say "thing which I also need to be solved" (anyway its the best solution till now): If I move the middle point, the curve to going to fast, to quick to the upper or lower boundaries). I would like it to go more smoothely to the upper and lower. So that it looks more logarithm-function like. So that it doesn't exeed the y-boundaries between 0 and 1 too soon.

Now my code looks like this:

curve::curve(void)
{
}

void curve::PushPoint2D(Point2D point)
{
    points.push_back(point);
}

Point2D curve::GetPoint( double x )
{
//GetPoint y for x with bezier-mathematics...

//was the only calculating function in old class "bezier"
//now the class is renamed "curve"
int i;
Point2D p;

p.x=0;
p.y=0;

if( points.size() == 1 ) return points[0];
if( points.size() == 0 ) return p;

curve b;
for (i=0;i<(int)points.size()-1;i++)
{
    p.x = ( points[i+1].x - points[i].x ) * x + points[i].x;
    p.y = ( points[i+1].y - points[i].y ) * x + points[i].y;
    if (points.size()<=2) return p;
    b.PushPoint2D(p);
}

return b.GetPoint(x);
}

//THIS IS NEW AND VERY VERY COOL
double curve::LagrangeInterpolation(double x)
{
double y = 0;

for (int i = 0; i <= (int)points.size()-1; i++)
{
    double numerator = 1;
    double denominator = 1;

    for (int c = 0; c <= (int)points.size()-1; c++)
    {
        if (c != i)
        {
            numerator *= (x - points[c].x);
            denominator *= (points[i].x - points[c].x);
        }
    }

    y += (points[i].y * (numerator / denominator));

}

return y;
}

curve::~curve(void)
{
}


double GetLogicalYAtX(double x)
{
curve cv;
Point2D p;

p.x=0; //always left edge
p.y=y1; //now by var
cv.PushPoint2D(p);

p.x=x2; //now by var
p.y=y2; //now by var
cv.PushPoint2D(p);

p.x=1; //always right edge
p.y=y3; //now by var
cv.PushPoint2D(p);

//p=cv.GetPoint(x);

//return p.y;

return cv.LagrangeInterpolation(x);
}

Old bezier curve Lagrange, cool but... ...clipping so soon...

Do you have any ideas how I could get the new solution a little bit more "soft"? So that I can move the 2. Point in larger areas without the curve going out of boundaries? Thank you

share|improve this answer
static bezier From3Points(const Point2D &a, const Point2D &b, const Point2D &c)
{
    bezier result;
    result.PushPoint2D(a);

    Point2D middle;
    middle.x = 2*b.x - a.x/2 - c.x/2;
    middle.y = 2*b.y - a.y/2 - c.y/2;
    result.PushPoint2D(middle);

    result.PushPoint2D(c);
    return result;
}

Untested, but should return a bezier curve where at t=0.5 the curve passes through point 'b'.

Additionally (more untested code ahead), you can calculate your points using bernstein basis polynomials like so.

static int binomialcoefficient (int n, int k)
{
    if (k == 0)
        return 1;
    if (n == 0)
        return 0;

    int result = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= k; ++i)
    {
        result += (n - (k - i))/i;
    }
    return result;
}

static double bernstein (int v, int n, double t)
{
    return binomialcoefficient(v,n) * pow(t,v) * pow(1 - t,n - v);
}

Point2D GetPoint (double t)
{
    Point2D result;
    result.x = 0;
    result.y = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < points.size(); ++i)
    {
        double coeff = bernstein (i,points.size(),t);
        result.x += coeff * points[i].x;
        result.y += coeff * points[i].y;
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't you have another PushPoint2D in there somewhere? A Bezier requires 4 points, unless you're using the rarer Quadradic form rather than a Cubic. –  Mark Ransom Feb 21 '13 at 20:26
    
Bezier works for n points. –  user1157123 Feb 21 '13 at 20:33
    
Bezier's are just recursively defined? I don't see why you need 4 points. So long as you supply the proper Bernstein basis polynomials it shouldn't matter. The quadratic Bezier curve is (1-t)^2P0 + 2(1-t)tP1 + t^2P2 And if you look at the bernstein polynomials B0,2 = (1 - x)^2 B1,2 = 2(1-x)x and B2,2 = x^2 They match, so there shouldn't be a problem regardless of pointcount. Op however is doing the recursive definition it appears, he would benifit from switching to the more straightforward sum definition. –  Tocs Feb 21 '13 at 20:45
    
@infact, yes theoretically a Bezier can be defined with as many points as you'd like. However the most commonly used form is the Cubic with 4 points; if more than 4 points are needed then the curve is broken into multiple independent segments with the end point of one defining the start point of the next. –  Mark Ransom Feb 21 '13 at 22:03
    
@MarkRansom I'm not sure how that would work, you wouldn't get a smooth curve at those intersections... Where are you getting this from? –  Tocs Feb 22 '13 at 0:41

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