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I have an ArrayList whose first three elements I want to move to the end of the list. I use 'set' but it's not working as expected:

List<Integer> integers = new ArrayList<Integer>();

for(Integer i : integers) {
    int index = integers.indexOf(i);
    if(index==0 || index==1 || index==2) {
        integers.set(i, integers.size()-1);
    }
}
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list stays intact. – user584513 Feb 21 '13 at 18:38
up vote 4 down vote accepted

use subList() and addAll() method appropriately

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1  
that will just add and not replace the elements. Remove throws ConcurrentModificationException. – user584513 Feb 21 '13 at 18:37
    
you don't need to iterate or remove(), see javadoc – Jigar Joshi Feb 21 '13 at 18:37
1  
While this answer offers the best approach, I believe it is too vague to be extremely helpful in its current state. +1 regardless. – Vulcan Feb 21 '13 at 18:38
1  
@Vulcan. I think, this is appropriate as for giving jus an idea of what to do. – Rohit Jain Feb 21 '13 at 18:39
3  
@user584513. I don't understand. What has order to do here, since you want just the first three elements to be removed? Please clarify your requirements. – Rohit Jain Feb 21 '13 at 18:40

List integers = new ArrayList();

Use: Collections.rotate(integers, -3);

For reference: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Collections.html#rotate%28java.util.List,%20int%29

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6  
+1 Nice. Wasn't aware of this method. – Rohit Jain Feb 21 '13 at 18:45
    
@Pshemo .. You are right .. just edited the answer – wraith Feb 21 '13 at 18:45
    
This will reverse the order of the elements, won't it? Not sure if it matters. – Kelly S. French Feb 22 '13 at 14:53
    
No, it won't reverse the order of the elements – wraith Feb 22 '13 at 17:51
for(int index=0;index<3;index++){
    integers.add(integers.get(0));
    integers.remove(0);
}

I think this ought to do it.

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Why not use add() to put them at the end and then delete the old element? The exception is due to the iterator being used after the list was modified. The answer is to save the three items using the iterator and then modify the list outside of the iterator.

List<Integer> integers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
Integer keep[] = new Integer[3];

for(Integer i : integers) {
    int index = integers.indexOf(i);
    if(index==0 || index==1 || index==2) {
        keep[i] = i;  // save the first three
    }
}

// add the first three to the end of the list
integers.add(keep[0]);
integers.add(keep[1]);
integers.add(keep[2]);


// remove the previous first three
integers.remove(0);
integers.remove(1);      
integers.remove(2);

I'm wondering if you need to do a integers.remove(0) three times depending on whether the 0'th element is reclaimed or left empty.

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4  
This will throw a ConcurrentModificationException – Reimeus Feb 21 '13 at 18:47
    
@Kelly looking at the javadoc or even trying it would answer your question (you have to remove(0) three times). And your code is becoming really complicated. Your previous attempt throw-ed an exception because the for-each loop internally uses an iterator... – pgras Feb 21 '13 at 19:27
    
I had just closed the javadoc when the thought occurred. The first rule of engineering is "get it working, THEN make it pretty". – Kelly S. French Feb 21 '13 at 19:37
    
@KellyS.French I agree and frankly I know the answer because I first tested the remove(0) remove(1) remove(2) solution just to see it doesn't work because after every remove the list elements are shifted so once you remove(0) the previous element at position 1 now has position 0... – pgras Feb 22 '13 at 9:37

The set method works at least as described in the Javadoc.

integers.set(i, integers.size()-1);

Changes your list by setting the value integers.size()-1 at the position i of your list :)

I think the Collections.rotate is the best solution but you could also add the first element of the list to its end and then remove the first element and repeat 3 times:

for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++){
    integers.add(integers.get(0));
    integers.remove(0);
}
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As the first answer, the form would be:

List<Integer> auxList = originalList.subList(0, 3);
for(int i =0; i < 3; i++) {originalList.remove(i);}
originalList.addAll(auxList);
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2  
Should be subList(0, 3) and you need to call removeAll(auxList) before the addAll(auxList) call. – Dan W Feb 21 '13 at 18:41

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