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In situations where the same element is passed to a function that is called many times, is it more efficient to store the element as a global variable?

For example you have a function that is called every key down and takes the parameter of button.

<input type="button" onkeydown="func1(document.getElementById('menu')" />
<div id="menu">
Dynamic text here
</div>

Instead of having

function func1(div)
{
....//body of function
}

is it better to do

var div//global variable
function func1()
{
  if(div === null)
  {
    div = document.getElementById('menu')
  }
  ...//rest of code
}

and call it with <input type="button" onkeydown="func1()" />

Or are global variables always a bad thing?

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You have to ask the question, "Why do I need it more efficient?" If the computer is just sitting there waiting for someone to type or move the mouse, why not use the CPU to run some Javascript. I would guess 10 keys per second is a reasonable upper limit so you have 100 ms to handle each key without a problem. If it is causing the on-screen objects to flicker painfully, it might be worth it. Usually, though, there are better ways to optimize than storing an element's id. –  Lee Meador Feb 21 '13 at 18:52
    
You are correct for being hesitant around global variables. But caching DOM elements is a good practice to have. You can still cached it, but just be sure you are doing so within a closure so that it is not a global element. Namespace, namespace, namespace! –  andyzinsser Feb 21 '13 at 18:56
    
Really, you shouldn't be using inline event handers. The need for global variables disappears if you connect handlers programatically –  Eric Feb 21 '13 at 18:59
    
@Eric what is an inline event handers? –  Celeritas Feb 21 '13 at 19:00
1  
You already are caching it in your example. You are caching it to div. I was just being explicit in my comment to help clarify. By caching, I mean storing it so that you do not have to do additional DOM lookups the next time you need it. –  andyzinsser Feb 21 '13 at 19:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

is it more efficient to store the element as a global variable?

Strictly speaking, the answer would be YES. You are saving function calls. But in practice the difference may be negligible.

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Global variable are dangerous for a big project, you will don't have the control over the variables, it's a more probability of conflicts, and etc... For your problem you can create a object that holds a cache about some functions, this way your use less global variables and organize your code for the best. Global variable needs to be used with moderation. =D

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Can you give an example of how such an object would look like that would cache? –  Celeritas Feb 21 '13 at 19:04
    

You can add the element as a property of the function, like this:

function func1()
{
  console.log(func1.element);
}

func1.element = document.getElementById('menu');

func1();

You can also check if the element exists inside the function:

function func1()
{
  if(func1.element == undefined) {
    func1.element = document.getElementById('menu'); 
  }

    console.log(func1.element);
}

func1();

This will keep you away from global variables and still keep the benefits of caching the element.

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