Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to grep a sublist of a list like grep -f in unix? say I have a dataframe

A 1 3 4 
B 4 5 6
C 7 8 9
D 1 3 4
E 1 3 3
F 2 4 5

and I only need

A 1 3 4 
C 7 8 9
E 1 3 3
F 2 4 5

by like grep c(A C E F) ? Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

I'm assuming the A C E F are rownames. Assumming that your data frame is called dd, basic subsetting should do the trick:

##Select rows where the rownames are in a particular vector
dd[rownames(dd) %in% c("A", "C", "E", "F"), ]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I want go one step further as the dataframe is 128 columns with 105k rows(128 x 105k), and my rownames ID is 3500 saved in a different file "subsetID.txt". How do I retrieve the subset of the dataframe? Thanks again! –  Ivan Feb 21 '13 at 20:13
    
Wish there is a way to combine all answers together! I was trying to grep a vector/column from another file, which is the subset of colnames of my dataframe. subset<-read.table("list.tab", header=F) dfrm[grepl(subset[,1], dfrm[,1]), ] But did not go thru. Any clue? Thanks again! –  Ivan Feb 21 '13 at 21:38

Assuming A..F are from column V1, you can use grepl which returns TRUE/FALSE:

# gives TRUE when V1 != B, D
df[grepl("[^BD]", df$V1), ]

#   V1 V2 V3 V4
# 1  A  1  3  4
# 3  C  7  8  9
# 5  E  1  3  3
# 6  F  2  4  5
share|improve this answer

If you want exactly the cases that are A, C, E or F in the first column and need to use grep then:

 dfrm[ grep("^[ACEF]$", dfrm[,1]), ]

If those letters were rownames then use rownames(dfrm) instead of dfrm[,1]

To create new object:

 newobj <- dfrm[ grep("^[ACEF]$", dfrm[,1]), ] 

To your comment: To save as an R object to later load into a session:

 save( newobj , file='newobj_file.rda')

To save as a text file:

 write.table( newobj, file='newobj_out.txt')

See ?write.table for various option on that and see the Import/Export Manual for much more background. It is part of your R installation. Use your help facilities. On my machine it is located in the R directories as : .... /doc/manual/R-data.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I need one further step for sublist saved in a file. –  Ivan Feb 21 '13 at 20:12
    
Do you mean you need an example of how to create a new object with this result? newobj <- dfrm[ grep("^[ACEF]$", dfrm[,1]), ] –  BondedDust Feb 21 '13 at 21:08
    
No, I mean "^[ACEF]$" is actually a vector from another file, which is the subset of colnames of dfrm. Thanks! –  Ivan Feb 21 '13 at 21:25
    
So they are not single letters? Do your really need to use grep? Please make an example that illustrates a reasonable approximation to the problem to be solved. –  BondedDust Feb 21 '13 at 21:32
    
No, I mean "^[ACEF]$" is actually a vector from another file, which is the subset of colnames of dfrm. subset<-read.table("list.tab", header=F) dfrm[grepl(subset[,1], dfrm[,1]), ] But did not go thru. Any clue? Thanks again! –  Ivan Feb 21 '13 at 21:39

Thanks DWin and csgillespie! The trick is the vector that I should pay more attention.

>dfrm
A 1 3 4 
B 4 5 6
C 7 8 9
D 1 3 4
E 1 3 3
F 2 4 5

and my list of the interest is stored in a file

subset <-read.table("infile", header=F)
>subset
1 A
2 C
3 E
4 F
> dfrm[rownames(dfrm) %in% subset[,1], ]
A 1 3 4 
C 7 8 9
E 1 3 3
F 2 4 5

I should have known that subset is a data frame, too. subset[,1] played the trick. Thank you csgillespie!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.