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Does OCaml use mutable or immutable data structure in implementation of sort?

For many sort algorithms, we need to exchange data between positions in list or array or something.

I am just wondering, if OCaml is always intended to use immutable data structures, then each exchange operation will create a new copy?

Will that impact the performance?

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For many sort algorithms, we need to exchange data between positions in list or array or something.

Not necessarily.

I am just wondering, if OCaml is always intended to use immutable data structures

No, OCaml has both mutable and immutable data structures. Using immutable data structures is generally preferred though.

then each exchange operation will create a new copy?

That would depend on the data structure in question. But generally you wouldn't want to express your sorting algorithm in terms of swapping individual elements when working with an immutable data structure (and as I indicated above, you certainly don't need to).

List.sort for example works on an immutable data structure (lists) and is perfectly efficient. It uses the merge sort algorithm (in current implementations of OCaml).

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Hi sepp2k, I am currently trying to implement many sorting algorithms for practice of OCaml. For example, if I want to implement insertion sort for a list, then how can I do that? insertion sort involves data exchange, right? –  Jackson Tale Feb 21 '13 at 19:55
    
by the way, sepp2k, do you remember one night, you helped me with my stupid question about type in sig/interface? I was totally lost in learning OCaml. But I am happy now that I stepped in the door, just need deeper understanding and practice about OCaml. –  Jackson Tale Feb 21 '13 at 19:56
    
@JacksonTale Insertion sort requires inserting an element between two existing elements - not swapping. That's O(n) per insertion (for a total of O(n^2) because you have n insertions) even in imperative languages. –  sepp2k Feb 21 '13 at 19:58
    
it depends how you see it, say we have D C B A, then the steps are: D C B A -> C D B A -> C B D A -> B C D A -> ... I mean just swap one by one until the final place it should be. But anyway, my real question is that if I implement a sorting which require many exchanges, does OCaml intend to do using immutable structure? If it is true, then in addition to O(n^2) insertions in your case, each time we need to copy all other elements to a new instance? –  Jackson Tale Feb 21 '13 at 20:08
    
Let me ask in another way, why List.sort doesn't choose quicksort? Is one of the reasons that quicksort is bad for immutable list as it requires many exchanges? –  Jackson Tale Feb 21 '13 at 20:10

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