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I'm trying to have an encapsulated class grab context, like a label, from the encapsulating class. One way to do that is to pass the label around, like during instantiation as I show below.

I've seen how the logging module allows you to subscribe to sublogs with the get_logger function, and I'd like to have a get_context() function. Is there any way to do this?

If this passing of the label goes one level, like YetAnotherClass below, it seem tolerable... but if you have to pass it down 3 or 4 levels --- that's where I really want another solution to pass this label around.

Should I be thinking about this in a different way? Here's some example code:

class RootClass(object) :
    def __init__(self) :
        self.ac = AnotherClass('root_class_context')
    def do_insert(self) :
        """ use DataTableMgr class to update table """
        self.ac.insert_to_table('field1', 'field2', 'field3')

class AnotherClass(object) :
    def __init__(self, label) :
        self.context = label
        self.dtm = DataTableMgr('arg1','arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4', self.context)

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3) :
        """ insert args to database using DataTableMgr """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table(field1, field2, field3)


class YetAnotherClass(object) :
    def __init__(self) :
        self.dtm = DataTableMgr('arg1','arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4', 'yetanother_context')

    def do_insert(self) :
        """ use DataTableMgr class to update table """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table('field1', 'field2', 'field3')

class DataTableMgr(object) :
    """ manage insert, updates to some table """
    def __init__(self, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4, user_id) :
        self.context = user_id

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3) :
        """ insert fields to table, while updating user id"""
        print( "inserting...(pretending to be updating sql database)")
        print(field1, field2, field3, self.context)
        print

if __name__ == "__main__" :
    #instantiate a class once removed from the inserting class and do insert
    rc = RootClass()
    rc.do_insert()

    #instantiate a class directly accessing the class for inserting
    yac = YetAnotherClass() 
    yac.do_insert()             

    #note how the context changes       
    print                                   
    print("Notice how the context changes?  "   
        ".. is there a better way to pass around this context information?")
share|improve this question
    
Another idea here, might be to use an environment variable... do this in the base class: import os; os.environ.setdefault('context', 'mylabel') and then os.environ.get('context') in the module. –  Voortuck Feb 21 '13 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

Well, the simpliest way I can think of is to use inheritance:

class DataTableMgr(object):
    """ manage insert, updates to some table """
    def __init__(self, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4, context):
        self.context = context

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3):
        """ insert fields to table, while updating user id"""
        print("inserting...(pretending to be updating sql database)")
        print(field1, field2, field3, self.context)
        print

    def do_insert(self):
        """ use DataTableMgr class to update table """
        self.insert_to_table('field1', 'field2', 'field3')


class AnotherClass(DataTableMgr):
    def __init__(self, context):
        DataTableMgr.__init__(self, 'arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4', context)


class RootClass(AnotherClass):
    def __init__(self):
        AnotherClass.__init__(self, 'root_class_context')


class YetAnotherClass(DataTableMgr):
    def __init__(self):
        DataTableMgr.__init__(
            self, 'arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4', 'yetanother_context')

But perhaps you don't want to use inheritance because the RootClass is not a DataTableMgr, but rather has a DataTableMgr. In that case, you might consider using polymorphism to pass along the context to the delegated encapsulated objects.

class Base(object):
    def do_insert(self):
        """ use DataTableMgr class to update table """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table('field1', 'field2', 'field3', self.context)

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3, context):
        """ insert args to database using DataTableMgr """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table(field1, field2, field3, context)

To facilitate the polymorphism, the delegated object should be accessible with self.dtm. Thus, when do_insert is called, the delegated object self.dtm calls its insert_to_table method. If self.dtm is a DataTableMgr instance, then DataTableMgr.insert_to_table is called. But if self.dtm is another Base instance, then the delegate's insert_to_table method is called. And so on, and so on, until the delegate is a DataTableMgr.

Here is an example with runnable code:

class Base(object):
    def do_insert(self):
        """ use DataTableMgr class to update table """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table('field1', 'field2', 'field3', self.context)

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3, context):
        """ insert args to database using DataTableMgr """
        self.dtm.insert_to_table(field1, field2, field3, context)


class RootClass(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        self.context = 'root_class_context'
        self.dtm = AnotherClass()


class AnotherClass(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        self.dtm = DataTableMgr('arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4')


class YetAnotherClass(Base):
    def __init__(self):
        self.context = 'yetanother_context'
        self.dtm = DataTableMgr('arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 'arg4')


class DataTableMgr(object):
    """ manage insert, updates to some table """
    def __init__(self, arg1, arg2, arg3, arg4):
        pass

    def insert_to_table(self, field1, field2, field3, context):
        """ insert fields to table, while updating user id"""
        print("inserting...(pretending to be updating sql database)")
        print(field1, field2, field3, context)
        print

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # instantiate a class once removed from the inserting class and do insert
    rc = RootClass()
    rc.do_insert()

    # instantiate a class directly accessing the class for inserting
    yac = YetAnotherClass()
    yac.do_insert()

    # note how the context changes
    print
    print("Notice how the context changes?  "
          ".. is there a better way to pass around this context information?")
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great reminder of polymorphism. In my case, I'm working with a bunch of legacy code, which rewriting is laborious for such a change. –  Voortuck Feb 21 '13 at 22:46

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