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How can I only return the first distinct match of a field in MySQL?

My Table:

name     hash
----------------
Anna     ABC
Barb     DEF
Charlie  GHI
Anna     JKL
Andrea   MNO

My Query (for %An%) :

SELECT DISTINCT(name) as name, hash FROM my_table WHERE name LIKE '%An%';

This returns:

name     hash
----------------
Anna     ABC
Anna     JKL
Andrea   MNO

Instead of: (the result I'm after)

name     hash
----------------
Anna     ABC
Andrea   MNO

How can I get only the first match of each distinct name?

I want to return the first Anna, skip the second (and any subsequent matches), but still get Andrea (and any further distinct matches, like Andrew or Anthony).

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

DISTINCT does not work that way, the values must be distinct across all columns being returned.

You can always use an aggregate function on the hash function and GROUP BY name which will return one hash value for each name:

SELECT name, min(hash) hash
FROM my_table 
WHERE name LIKE '%An%' 
GROUP BY name;

See SQL Fiddle with Demo.

Note: using the aggregate function with the GROUP BY will make sure that you will always return the expected value for the hash column. When you do not GROUP BY or aggregate the items in the SELECT list, you might return unexpected results. (see MySQL Extensions to GROUP BY)

From the MySQL Docs:

MySQL extends the use of GROUP BY so that the select list can refer to nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause. ... You can use this feature to get better performance by avoiding unnecessary column sorting and grouping. However, this is useful primarily when all values in each nonaggregated column not named in the GROUP BY are the same for each group. The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate. Furthermore, the selection of values from each group cannot be influenced by adding an ORDER BY clause. Sorting of the result set occurs after values have been chosen, and ORDER BY does not affect which values the server chooses.

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SELECT 
  name, hash 
FROM 
  my_table 
WHERE 
  name LIKE '%An%' 
GROUP BY 
  name;
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Sorry that was a typo. I was editing it. –  Slowcoder Feb 21 '13 at 19:44
    
So it's that easy huh? I thought the group by was redundant since I was using distinct. –  Ryan Feb 21 '13 at 19:44
    
yes it is. distinct will be useful when all column values in the rows match. In this case DISTINCT can be removed. –  Slowcoder Feb 21 '13 at 19:46
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try this

SELECT name , hash FROM my_table WHERE name LIKE '%An%'
GROUP BY name;

DEMO SQLFIDDLE HERE

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When using GROUP BY, MySQL destroy the desc order on the same query level.

Instead of:

SELECT name, hash 
FROM my_table
GROUP BY name
ORDER BY name ASC, hash DESC

Use sub query on descending order:

SELECT * FROM(
  SELECT name, hash
  FROM my_table
  ORDER BY name ASC, hash DESC
)Q 
GROUP BY name
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DISTINCT provides unique rows of data. In your example hash is different, hence why you are not getting the results you want.

Question: What is hash used for? Do you need it to unique, or is it not needed?

If you do not need it, remove it from the SELECT clause and you will have unique names.

If you need it, but it does not need to be unique, you can add a GROUP BY clause, i.e. GROUP BY name which will group your results by name (giving you only unique names). Note, using GROUP BY means that the value of hash could be either 'ABC' or 'JKL' when name is 'Anna'.

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When you say "the value of the hash could either be ABC or JKL", isn't it always going to be the first one in the table? What scenario (apart from sorting), would lead this to be random? –  Ryan Feb 21 '13 at 19:53
    
@Ryan there is no guarantee if you do not aggregate the hash column as to what the value will be. That is why I included a note about that in my answer, see my updated answer. –  bluefeet Feb 21 '13 at 19:55
    
I guess that's what I don't understand. If I were to run the simple query: SELECT name, min(hash) hash FROM my_table WHERE name LIKE '%An%' GROUP BY name; I would expect to get Anna matched to ABC 100% of the time. Under what scenario should I expect to get JKL? –  Ryan Feb 21 '13 at 21:37
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