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I have thousands of non well-formed XML files to patch up.

Many of them contain the following issue: <someTag attr='text [< 99]'/> (note left angle in square brackets).

I would like to write a sed expression to replace all instances of [< with [&lt; for *.xml.

sed -n 19p myFile.xml returns <someTag attr='text [<99]'/> as expected.

echo '[<45' | sed -n '/\[</p' returns [<45 as expected.

However, sed -n '/\[</p' myFile.xml returns nothing so apparently I need a different syntax when using that expression against a file as opposed to echo. What syntax do I need to use?

Also, once I have this done, my plan is to do something like

sed -i -n 's/correct expression/\[&lt;/g/p' *.xml to run it against all matches in all files and output the new version to help me debug. Does that seem reasonable?

BTW, sed seemed like the tool to use, but I'm perfectly fine using any other solution that runs on Linux.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
The example you gave, sed -n '/\[</p' file, seems to work fine for me. I'm using the terminal in OS X 10.7. – Matt LaFave Feb 21 '13 at 20:14
    
You're right. I sed'd line 19 into a separate file and then couldn't match it. At that point, I went crazy. When I copied and pasted the offending item into a text editor, though, I realized that '(' and '[' look identical on this crappy VT. – user2029783 Feb 21 '13 at 20:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

However, sed -n '/\[</p' myFile.xml returns nothing so apparently I need a different syntax when using that expression against a file as opposed to echo.

Hm, works for me:

echo '[<45' > test.xml
sed -n '/\[</p' test.xml

returns [<45.

That said, if you want to replace, do something like

sed 's/\[</[\&lt;/g'

For example, to modify all xml files directly, do

sed -i 's/\[</[\&lt;/g' *.xml

(the -i switch is for directly modifying the files; otherwise, their contents will be sent to stdout)

Does that seem reasonable?

Sure, that is what sed is for.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah...just a combination of '(' looking identical to '[' on this old virtual terminal. Oh, well. :) – user2029783 Feb 21 '13 at 20:29
    
FYI: You said sed 's/\[</[\&lt;/g'. I'm guessing you meant sed 's/\[</[\&lt;/g' *.xml? Given that the terminal is hard to read and '(' looks like '[', I changed that to sed 's/(</(\&lt;/g' *.xml and it doesn't actually change the affected files. Did I misinterpret? – user2029783 Feb 22 '13 at 0:21
1  
Yes, I only gave you the basic option. Use -i to replace the files in place (just like you wrote in your question). – January Feb 22 '13 at 2:32

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