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I have to do a couple of selects and an update using Python. Totally new at this language, and I am having a bit of trouble with the syntax when doing the following (simple) queries:

SELECT A.CUSTOMER_NAME,
A.CUSTOMER_CITY,
B.POPULATION
FROM
CONTRACTS AS A
JOIN CITIES AS B ON
A.CUSTOMER_CITY = B.IDENT
WHERE B.POPULATION <=500000

SELECT A.IDENT,
A.MAKE,
A.MODEL,
A.LUXURY,
B.CAR_IDENT
FROM CARS AS A
JOIN CONTRACTS AS B ON
A.IDENT = B.CAR_IDENT
WHERE LUXURY = 'Y'

UPDATE CONTRACTS
SET BASE_PRICE=1000
WHERE CONTRACT_CLASS >=10

I am starting with the update...i figured it was shorter to code.... When I do the update statement, I get the following error:

>'update {} set BASE_PRICE = ? where {}'.format(self._table), (row['BASE_PRICE'], >row['where']))
>IndexError: tuple index out of range

Here's what I have for my methods

    def retrieve(self, key):
        cursor = self._db.execute('select  from {}'.format(self._table))
        return dict(cursor.fetchone())

    def update(self, row):
        self._db.execute(
            'update {} set BASE_PRICE = ? where {}'.format(self._table), 
            (row['BASE_PRICE'], row['where']))
        self._db.commit()

    def disp_rows(self):
        cursor = self._db.execute('select IDENT, CONTRACT_CLASS, BASE_PRICE from {} order 
        by BASE_PRICE'.format(self._table))
        for row in cursor:
            print('  {}: {}: {}'.format(row['IDENT'], row['CONTRACT_CLASS'], 
            row['BASE_PRICE']))

    def __iter__(self):
        cursor = self._db.execute('select * from {} order by  
        BASE_PRICE'.format(self._table))
        for row in cursor:
            yield dict(row)


    def main():
    db_cities = database(filename = 'insurance.sqlite', table = 'CITIES')
    db= database(filename = 'insurance.sqlite', table = 'CONTRACTS')
    db_cars = database(filename = 'insurance.sqlite', table = 'CARS')

    print('Retrieve rows')
    for row in db: print(row)

    print('Update rows')
    db.update({'where': 'CONTRACT_CLASS' >= 10', 'BASE_PRICE'= 1000})
    for row in db: print(row)

    print('Retrieve rows after update')
    for row in db: print(row)

Thanks in advance for your help!
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You misplaced a bracket after self._table.

'UPDATE {table_name} SET BASE_PRICE = {base_price} WHERE {condition}'.format(
     table_name=self._table,
     base_price=row['BASE_PRICE'],
     condition=row['where']
 )

I also did a little code cleanup.

Another question: Why aren't you using an ORM?

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, this worked! Moving on to the other 2 queries now. –  engr007 Feb 21 '13 at 20:27
    
Did you now understand the usage of format()? The fact I'm using names in the braces is more idomatically, without them also works but isn't that readable. –  floqqi Feb 21 '13 at 20:31
    
yes, the format is easy to understand –  engr007 Feb 21 '13 at 20:41
    
how about when I have to do SQL joins....how to reference more than 1 table in the db.execute? def retrieve(self, key): cursor = self._db.execute('select * from {}'.format(self._table)) return dict(cursor.fetchone()) –  engr007 Feb 21 '13 at 20:44
    
What is an ORM? –  engr007 Feb 21 '13 at 20:47

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