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I have a directory on a Linux host with several property files which I want to edit by replacing hardcoded values with placeholder tags. My goal was to have a perl script which reads a delimited file that contains entries for each of the property files listing the hardcoded value, the placeholder value and the name of the file to edit.

For example, in file.prop I have these values set

            <connection targetHostUrl="99.99.99.99"
                        targetHostPort="9999"

And I want to replace the values with tags as shown below

            <connection targetHostUrl="TARGETHOST"
                        targetHostPort="PORT"

There will be several entries similar to this so I have to match on the unique combination of IP and PORT so I need a multiline match.

To do this I wrote the following script to take the input of the delimited filename, which is delimited with ||. I go get that file from the config directory and read in the values to get the hardcoded value, tag, and filename to edit. Then I read in that property file, do the substitution and then write it out again.

#!/usr/bin/perl
my $config = $ARGV[0];
chomp $config;
my $filename = '/config/' . $config;
my ($hard,$tagg,$prop);
open(DATAFILE, $filename) or die "Could not open DATAFILE $filename.";
while(<DATAFILE>)
{
  chomp $_;
  ($hard,$tagg,$prop) = split('\|\|', $_);
$*=1;
open(INPUT,"</properties/$prop") or die "Could not open INPUT $prop.";
@input_array=<INPUT>;
close(INPUT);
$input_scalar=join("",@input_array);
$input_scalar =~ s/$hard/$tagg/;
open(OUTPUT,">/properties/$prop") or die "Could not open OUTPUT $prop.";
print(OUTPUT $input_scalar);
close(OUTPUT);
}
close DATAFILE;

Inside the config file I have the following entry

<connection targetHostUrl="99.99.999.99"(.|\n)*?targetHostPort="9999"||<connection targetHostUrl="TARGETHOST1"\n targetHostPort="PORT"||file.prop

My output is as shown below. It puts what I hoped to be a newline as a literal \n

<connection targetHostUrl="TARGETHOST"\n targetHostPort="PORT"

I can't find a way to get the \n taken as a newline. At first I thought, no problem, I'll just do a 2nd substitution like

perl -i -pe 's/\\n/\n/o' $prop

and although this works, for some reason it puts ^M characters at the end of every line except the one I did the replacement on. I don't want to do a 3rd replace to strip them out.

I've searched and found other ways of doing the multiline search/replace but they all interpret the \n literally.

Any suggestions?

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1  
If it's some XML files, better use a XML parser. Search XML on cpan –  sputnick Feb 21 '13 at 20:31
2  
You might want to learn some Perl that's not 15 years old (that /o has never made sense; $* doesn't exist anymore; bareword filehandles have been obsolete since 5.6; etc). –  melpomene Feb 21 '13 at 20:44
    
"it puts ^M characters at the end of every line except the one I did the replacement on" is probably you misinterpreting the output. It's more likely the other lines already have ^Ms and you're just not seeing them. –  melpomene Feb 21 '13 at 20:45
    
sputnick - I just feel an xml parser is overkill in this case, and I want to use the same script for all file types if possible. –  user2096956 Feb 22 '13 at 23:56
    
melpomene - Yes I could use /g instead of /o but as the entry will only exist once I didn't go with /g. The file does not have ^M characters in it already, it's in Unix format and when viewed in vi prior to the replacement there are no ^M characters. It's only after trying to replace the \n with a newline that they show up on all the other lines. –  user2096956 Feb 22 '13 at 23:56

1 Answer 1

My output is as shown below. It puts what I hoped to be a newline as a literal \n

Why would it insert a newline when the string doesn't contain one?

I can't find a way to get the \n taken as a newline.

There isn't any. If you want to substitute a newline, you need to provide a newline.

If you used a proper CSV parser like Text::CSV_XS, you could put a newline in your data file.

Otherwise, you'll have to write some code to handle the escape sequences you want your code to handle.

for some reason it puts ^M characters at the end of every line except the one I did the replacement on.

Quite the opposite. It removes it from the one line you did the replacement on.

That's home some programs represent a Carriage Return. You have a file with CR LF line ends. You could use dos2unix to convert it, or you could leave it as is because XML doesn't care.

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What I was looking for was exactly what you said - "some code to handle the escape sequences" –  user2096956 Feb 22 '13 at 23:53

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