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I have following scenario. I want to delegate responsibility of setting creation date to DAO objects.

    Class Product{
     //other fields
     Date creationDate;
    }

    Class ProductDAO{
      private GenericDAO dao;
      public void create(Product p){
         p.setCreationDate(new Date());
         dao.create(p);
      }
    }

    Class Main{
      private ProductDAO productDAO; 
      public void createProduct(){
         Product p = new Product();
         productDAO.create(p);
         LOG.debug(p.getCreationDate());
      } 
    }
  1. Now issue is, when I test createProduct method of main class by mocking productDAO, how to define the behavior of mock object 'productDAO' so that it sets the creation date and log statement does not throw NullPointerException?
  2. Does above approach seem right? Should I return updated Product object from create method of ProductDAO class instead of relying on side effect?

     Product create(Product p){
           p.setCreationDate(new Date());
           dao.create(p);
           return p;
      }
    
  3. Or in Main class, should I read object from database back after creating instead of relying on return object or side effect of createProduct method? Only thing in this case is it would add overhead of making extra call.

     public void createProduct(){
         Product p = new Product();
         productDAO.create(p);
         p = productDAO.read(p.getId());
         LOG.debug(p.getCreationDate());
      } 
    

Sorry for long question. I hope I was able to explain.

share|improve this question
    
What is GenericDAO? –  Paul Vargas Feb 21 '13 at 21:32
    
Are you using JPA under the covers? –  icwnd Feb 21 '13 at 21:37
    
Why not just mock GenericDAO instead of ProductDAO? –  Eric Galluzzo Feb 21 '13 at 21:37
    
GenericDAO is generic dao class with generic type parameter. GenericDAO<Product> dao. –  Jitendra Feb 21 '13 at 21:38
    
@EricGalluzzo, I am testing Main class so shouldn't I mock only direct dependencies? –  Jitendra Feb 21 '13 at 21:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way to test if the date is set is using argThat. You would need to do something like

@Test
public void shouldSetCreationDateAtProductWhenCreatingIt() {
     // given
     Product product = mock(Product.class);

     // when
     dao.create(product);

     // then
     verify(product).setCreationDate(argThat(is(not(nullValue(Date.class)))));
}

So, I did only a simple verification that Product#setCreationDate(Date) was called with non null value of Date. You can create your custom matcher to see if the Date object is the one that you expects. This is to only test the class ProductDao.

If you want to unit test Main in a manner that you need to mock the return of getCreationDate, you could add a return to your ProductDao#create, making it return the persisted object.

 public class ProductDao {
     public Product create(Product p){
        p.setCreationDate(new Date());
        dao.create(p);
        return p;
     }
 }

then you can mock the return of productDao at your Main class

  @Test
  public void shouldUseReturnedProductFromDaoToLog() {
       // given
       Product product = mock(Product.class);
       Date creationDate = new Date();

       given(product.getCreationDate()).willReturn(creationDate);
       given(dao.create(any(Product.class)).willReturn(product);

       // when      
       Product createdProduct = main.createProduct();

       // then
       assertThat(createdProduct, is(equalTo(product)));
  }

I added a return to createProduct, because I wanted to test if it's the same returned from the DAO. We separate then the unit tests that see if ProductDao do what is expected (setting creationDate) from Main (creating the Product and persisting it at the Dao)

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
  1. I think a perfectly valid approach would be to make an instance of Product which has a creationDate "set" and have your mockProductDao return that.

    Date timeStamp = new Date();
    Product productWithCreationDate = new Product();
    productWithCreationDate.setCreationDate(timeStamp);
    when(mockProductDao.create(anyObject()).thenReturn(productWithCreationDate);
    
  2. I don't think you need to return p from your ProductDAO, since any place you call productDAO.create(p), then you have access to 'p' (with creationDate) on the very next line - right?

  3. You only need to read p back from the DAO if you don't trust the DAO layer :) So, given that you are confident the DAO layer will throw the correct exception if create() method fails, I don't think u need to re-read p again (IMHO).

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
what if another programmer forgets to set creation date. I want to ensure that creation date is always set. I am using DynamoDB so I can't use Not null constraint or something like that. –  Jitendra Feb 21 '13 at 21:42
    
Presuming that another programmer should also be using your same DAO, then it's easy - you just need to test your DAO layer. –  vikingsteve Feb 21 '13 at 21:54

Why would you need to assign creation Date via the setter?Just assign the Date in constructor:

Product p = new Product();  //here you set creation date
productDAO.create(p);  
share|improve this answer
    
I am using ORM for DynamoDB which needs empty constructor and that's why setters are also required which creates possibility that another programmer can also use that. –  Jitendra Feb 21 '13 at 21:44
    
What do you mean empty constructor?Default constructor can have code in it.But not arguments.Just create the date in default constructor –  Cratylus Feb 21 '13 at 21:49

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