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How to send notifications down the visual tree?

Here is simple code example:

class MyButton1 : Button
{
 ....
}

Generic.XAML looks like this:

         <Style TargetType="{x:Type local:MyButton1}">
            <Setter Property="Template">
                <Setter.Value>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:MyButton1}">
                        <Button>
                           <StackPanel>
                             <Label>
                              <local:MyTextBlock1 Text="Not working yet."/>
                             </Label>
                            </StackPanel>
                        </Button>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Setter.Value>
            </Setter>
        </Style>

There is no VIEWMODEL. Its a custom control and when MyButton1 is clicked it should notify MyTextBlock1 to change text to "It is working". The MyButton1 is at top level on visual tree and MyTextblock1 is somewhere deep down.

So how to send notifiction down the visual tree and handle them at specific element?. In my case its MyButton1 and when clicked the notification should travel down the visual tree till MyTextBlock1. There should then the notification be handled and text should be changed to "It is working".

share|improve this question
    
Strait forward answer to your edited question...(see detailed answer below) The View doesn't, the ViewModel does (sort of). –  EtherDragon Feb 26 '13 at 23:09
    
I edited my question. Its now a simple problem with code. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 27 '13 at 16:34
    
You are having problems with this because there is no ViewModel. You don't need to change the structure of your XML to use data binding / MVVM, I cannot stress this enough. See my edited answer. –  EtherDragon Feb 27 '13 at 16:56
    
I cannot override the DataContext with my own because its a custom control. Some other programmer with use the custom control and he will set desized DataContext/ViewModel.. But when Button is clicked the textbox should set "Its working". Or it should set "Max Muster" to show the user that there he needs to type in a first name and last name... Thats something the view should do and not ViewModel. Or am i wrong? –  snowy hedgehog Feb 27 '13 at 17:07
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MVVM and DataBinding Example.

My simple Person class

public class Person
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}

My simple PersonViewModel class

public class PersonViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public PersonViewModel(Person person)
    {
        if (person == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("person");
        this.Model = person;

        this.ShowFirstNameCommand = new DelegateCommand((o) => this.showFirstName());
        this.ShowLastNameCommand = new DelegateCommand((o) => this.showLastName());
    }

    public ICommand ShowFirstNameCommand { get; private set; }
    public ICommand ShowLastNameCommand { get; private set; }

    public Person Model { get; private set; }

    public string FirstName
    {
        get
        {
            return this.Model.FirstName;
        }
        set
        {
            this.Model.FirstName = value;
            this.OnPropertyChanged("FirstName");
        }
    }

    public string LastName
    {
        get
        {
            return this.Model.LastName;
        }
        set
        {
            this.Model.LastName = value;
            this.OnPropertyChanged("LastName");
        }
    }

    private string _showString;

    public string ShowString
    {
        get
        {
            return this._showString;
        }
        set
        {
            this._showString = value;
            this.OnPropertyChanged("ShowString");
        }
    }

    private void showFirstName()
    {
        this.ShowString = this.FirstName;
    }

    private void showLastName()
    {
        this.ShowString = this.LastName;
    }

    #region INPC code - can create an abstract base view model class and put this there instead

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        this.OnPropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var handler = this.PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

DelegateCommand class to make Button Commands work

// Copyright © Microsoft Corporation.  All Rights Reserved.
// This code released under the terms of the 
// Microsoft Public License (MS-PL, http://opensource.org/licenses/ms-pl.html.)

using System;
using System.Windows.Input;

namespace WpfApplication1
{
public class DelegateCommand : ICommand
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Action to be performed when this command is executed
    /// </summary>
    private Action<object> executionAction;

    /// <summary>
    /// Predicate to determine if the command is valid for execution
    /// </summary>
    private Predicate<object> canExecutePredicate;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the DelegateCommand class.
    /// The command will always be valid for execution.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="execute">The delegate to call on execution</param>
    public DelegateCommand(Action<object> execute)
        : this(execute, null)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the DelegateCommand class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="execute">The delegate to call on execution</param>
    /// <param name="canExecute">The predicate to determine if command is valid for execution</param>
    public DelegateCommand(Action<object> execute, Predicate<object> canExecute)
    {
        if (execute == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("execute");
        }

        this.executionAction = execute;
        this.canExecutePredicate = canExecute;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Raised when CanExecute is changed
    /// </summary>
    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
    {
        add { CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value; }
        remove { CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value; }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the delegate backing this DelegateCommand
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="parameter">parameter to pass to predicate</param>
    /// <returns>True if command is valid for execution</returns>
    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return this.canExecutePredicate == null ? true : this.canExecutePredicate(parameter);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the delegate backing this DelegateCommand
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="parameter">parameter to pass to delegate</param>
    /// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">Thrown if CanExecute returns false</exception>
    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        if (!this.CanExecute(parameter))
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The command is not valid for execution, check the CanExecute method before attempting to execute.");
        }
        this.executionAction(parameter);
        }
    }
}

Code that goes into MainWindow.xaml.

<StackPanel>
    <Button Command="{Binding Path=ShowFirstNameCommand}">Click to show first name</Button>
    <Button Command="{Binding Path=ShowLastNameCommand}">Click to show last name</Button>
    <TextBox Text="{Binding Path=ShowString}" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"/>
</StackPanel>

Code that goes into App.xaml.cs to glue this together

public partial class App : Application { protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e) { base.OnStartup(e);

        var personvm = new PersonViewModel( new Person
        {
            FirstName = "John",
            LastName = "Smith"
        });

        var window = new MainWindow
        {
            DataContext = personvm
        };

        window.Show();
    }
}

Basically I show 2 buttons and a textbox on my screen. One of the buttons will show a person's firstname in the textbox when clicked, and the other one will show the person's lastname in the same textbox. If you inspect the code, you will see I achieve this using WPF Commanding. The Command properties of the buttons are bound to ICommand properties on my PersonViewModel class. These properties are then "bound" (using DelegateCommand) to private methods in the same viewmodel class. I also have a Public ShowString property that is data bound to my Textbox on the screen, which is used to control the string that shows up in the Textbox. You will see that my private methods in the viewmodel class change the value of this ShowString property to change the data that shows up in the Textbox.

My xaml code is different to what you have (you didn't provide your code), but the concept should work for you.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
No no no no. This is not helping me. Please read my question again. Do not change the structure of xaml. In my question i have set the structure like this 1. Button then StackPanel then ContentPresenter then DataTemplate then Textboxes. Not change it as you wish because then your xaml is invalid. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 26 '13 at 23:40
1  
@hedgehog I'm not here to do your homework/job/hobby for you. I'm trying to show you a technique of MVVM and databinding. It doesn't matter if the button is in a stackpanel, grid, dockpanel, tabcontrol whatever. The technique will still work as long as you hook up the viewmodel to the datacontext of the correct control, and bind the Command property of the control to your ICommand property in the viewmodel. If you need specific help understanding how your xaml code can work with databinding and mvvm, then please post your xaml code so we can help you. –  failedprogramming Feb 27 '13 at 1:43
    
@hedgehog Ok it is good that you have now mentioned that you are working with a custom control. I think most of us have assumed that you were having problems with a user control or a window. I haven't played around with Custom controls so I'm afraid I can't help you. But I believe you need to use dependency properties and templatebinding to achieve your goal. Here's a link that might help you with this. codeproject.com/Articles/49802/… Good luck! –  failedprogramming Feb 27 '13 at 23:38
    
yea captain drowns with the ship.. seems i am gonna be stuck with this forever –  snowy hedgehog Mar 2 '13 at 13:20

You should have a think about using the MVVM design pattern when developing with WPF, and using an MVVM framework to provide you with a lot of functionality out of the box.

In an MVVM pattern, you would have a viewmodel that is the data context for your view. Your view would contain your 2 text boxes and button.

The MVVM framework would provide some mechanism for calling a method on your viewmodel when the button is clicked.

Your viewmodel would expose 2 public string properties that are bound to your 2 text boxes on your view. When the button is clicked, the viewmodel method is invoked, and that sets the value of your 2 string properties, which then updates the text within the textboxes via WPF data binding.

That's the concept, but I would have a read up on MVVM and then have a look at comparing the MVVM frameworks.

share|improve this answer
    
I am afraid you have completely changed the structure of my design and of VisualTree. In your example I would not need DataTemplate. But I must use the specifications as written in my question. I must use a Style and inside Style there is StackPanel with 2 entries. Futhermore I must also use the DataTemplate and inside it there are the 2 TextBoxes. The reason why I must use all this is to understand how to notify among elements in VisualTree. Therefore I was hoping somebody could answer me this problem how to notify textboxes to change when top-level button is clicked. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 21 '13 at 23:37
    
I have edited my question explaining why I have such little bit complex structure of VisualTree. It is important to me to understand how to send notifications among elements in VisualTree no matter where they are actually positioned. For example as the question shows the Button is at top level but Textboxes are somewhere else in the depth of VisualTree. Still there should be a way to send notifications/events between Button and Textboxes. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 21 '13 at 23:46
    
What business problem are you actually trying to solve? I'm not sure what you're trying to achieve, but have you had a look at the VisualTreeHelper? –  devdigital Feb 21 '13 at 23:53
    
The business problem is I have and element at top level such as Button and when Button is clicked an element should get notified. That element could be such as in my example the Textbox. When Button clicked the Textbox should get notified and it should change Text value. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 21 '13 at 23:59
    
If you don't want to use mvvm and databinding, you can give the text boxes named and add some codebehind logic to the button click event to alter the textbox. Text property. –  failedprogramming Feb 22 '13 at 8:56

Code Behind Example

In your xaml,

<Button Click="Button_Click_1">Click me</Button>
<TextBox Name="myTextBox" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" />

In your code behind,

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.myTextBox.Text = "Hello World";
    }
}

Basically the concept is, if you give a name to your control, you can manipulate its properties in the code behind by calling the name directly as shown in my example.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited the question. Please take a look at it again. There is code now. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 27 '13 at 16:33

So, let's assume you are using MVVM with DataBinding, let's take a look at your visual tree...

Somewhere you have a Button...

<Button OnClick="MyButtonOnClick">
// Your Button Content Here
</Button>

Somewhere you have a TextBox, as a decendant (in the tree) of your Button.

  <TextBox Binding="FirstName" />

I only demonstrate bits of the View XAML so that you know how to DataBind - It is not the job of the view to update the contents of your text box in the code-behind. This should all be handled through proper data-binding, which does not require you to change your visual tree or design.

Your person class in the ViewModel is responsible for alerting the UI that the data has changed. It will look something like this:

public class Person
{
  private proeprty _firstName;
  public property FirstName
  {
    get
    {
      return _firstName;
    }
    set
    {
      _firstName = value;
      NotifyPropertyChanged("FirstName"); // This is required to notify the UI. Specific implementation will depend on your property notification pattern.
    }
  }

Properly bound controls, like your TextBox, "listen" for when the property they are bound to notifies that they have changed, like the FirstName property of the Person class. So in your code behind, you don't need to instruct the Text Boxes to update; they are bound. Bound text boxes already know to listen for change notifications from the property they are bound to.

But you still need to have your code behind update the property in your ViewModel. This is done in your button click event handler:

public partial class MyView
{
  ... // All your other code

  // Event Handler for the Button Click
  public void MyButtonOnClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
  {
    Person myPerson = this.DataContext as Person;
    myPerson.FirstName = "Some New Value"; // When I set this property, it will automatically notify any listeners that its contents have changed.
  }

  ...
}

This beginning example of MVVM domonstrates how you should be separating your concerns between the application layers.

The View is responsible for handling user interraction, sending data to and retrieving data from the ViewModel - any thing else is out of scope for the View.

The ViewModel is responsible for sending/retriving data in the Model and broadcasting a notification when the data has changed (either by user interraction or as a result of an update from another part of the ViewModel - any thing else is out of scope for the ViewModel. The ViewModel does not care who is listening, it only cares about broadcasting changes through notifications.

Of course, your Model is there to model the data as you have it in your database or other repository. It doesn't care about the existance of the ViewModel; it's the ViewModel's job to utilize the Model.

share|improve this answer
    
No no no no. This is not helping me. Please read my question again.Do not change the structure of xaml. In my question i have set the structure like this 1. Button then StackPanel then ContentPresenter then DataTemplate then Textboxes. Do not change it as you wish because then your xaml is invalid. Read my question again carefully. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 26 '13 at 23:39
1  
@hedgehog perhaps it would be helpful if you posted the precise structure of your XAML. The point you seem to be missing is you don't need to change the structure of your xaml to use databinding. The structure I offered was what I thought was an example of what you posted in the message. I'll update my post to be more clear. –  EtherDragon Feb 26 '13 at 23:49
    
I edited my question to a simple problem with code. –  snowy hedgehog Feb 27 '13 at 16:32

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