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I am trying to iterate through an array that will contain up to a maximum of 4 elements - no other knowledge of the array-length exists.

Pseudo Code

void insert_vals(uint8_t num, uint8_t *match_num, uint8_t *value)
{
    uint8_t i;

    while(data_exists)  // how do I determine if data exists in 'value'?
    {
        switch(num)
        {
            case 0:
            {
                switch(match_num[i])
                {
                    case 0:
                        hw0reg0 = value[i];
                    case 1:
                        hw0reg1 = value[i];
                    case 2:
                        hw0reg2 = value[i];
                    case 3:
                        hw0reg3 = value[i];
                }
            }
            case 1:
            {
                switch(match_num[i])
                {
                    case 0:
                        hw1reg0 = value[i];
                    case 1:
                        hw1reg1 = value[i];
                    case 2:
                        hw1reg2 = value[i];
                    case 3:
                        hw1reg3 = value[i];                 
                }
            }
            // etc. 2 other cases
        }
        i++;
    }
}

Calling Example (Pseudo Code)

/*
 * num: hardware device select from 1 - 4
 * match_num: 4 possible matches for each hardware device
 * value: 32-bit values to be assigned to 4 possible matches
 * NOTE: This function assumes hardware devices are selected
 * in a consecutive order; I will change this later.
 */

 // example calling code - we could have configured 4 hardware devices
 insert_vals(0, [0, 1], [0x00000001, 0x000000FF]);  // arg2 and arg3 equal in length

How can I accomplish this?

In a character array, C will automatically add '\0' to the end of the array, but this does not seem to be the case for an integer array. If I was somehow able to determine the length of match_num and value (see if statement) at runtime originally, then that would allow me to create a for loop.

Edit

Since I know that there will be a maximum of 4 elements, couldn't I do something similar to the following?

void insert_vals(uint8_t num, uint8_t *match_num, uint32_t *value)
{
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        if(value[i] == -1)
            break;
        else
        {
            // Assign data
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
.........magic? –  Ed S. Feb 22 '13 at 0:30
    
Please show the calling code. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 22 '13 at 0:31
    
Sorry guys - there you go. –  Biff Feb 22 '13 at 0:46
    
@Biff This calling code compiles for you? –  junix Feb 22 '13 at 0:52
    
No, this is merely pseudo code. I probably would have to declare the array outside of the function call, right? –  Biff Feb 22 '13 at 0:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't get the length of an array pointed to given only the pointer. Either you have to pass the length, or it must be constant (always 4) with some sentinel value in the unused elements -- a value that is somehow invalid for your computations (like NUL is for strings).

share|improve this answer
    
Assuming I did pass in the length, would that mean sizeof(my_array)/sizeof(int) would work at compile-time if outside the function like you say? –  Biff Feb 22 '13 at 0:31
    
@Biff: that would work of the division is performed at some place where my_array is actually an array (not a pointer). –  larsmans Feb 22 '13 at 0:33
    
That would mean changing my arguments as match_num[] and value[], respectively. Correct? –  Biff Feb 22 '13 at 0:47
    
@Biff: no, that wouldn't change a thing as it's just syntactic sugar for pointer arguments. –  larsmans Feb 22 '13 at 0:48
3  
@Biff: You can't pass arrays to functions or return them from functions, simple as that. This isn't exactly a new problem; you need to pass the length along with the pointer (or add an end marker). –  Ed S. Feb 22 '13 at 2:01

Is there a value you can guarantee it's not in the "usable" data? (e.g. 0 is no valid character for character strings, therefore Mr. Kernighan and Mr. Ritchie decided to pick it as a "end of array" marker. You could do the same with any value.

Say you know your integer values are between 0 to 512, so you could initialize the whole array e.g. to 1024, then fill it and iterate through it until a number >512 occurs (which has to be your end of array marker).

Another possibility is to pass the number of elements in the array along with the array.

share|improve this answer
    
See my calling example. –  Biff Feb 22 '13 at 0:48

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