Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am going to develop enterprise apps towards a WebSphere 8.5 server. WebSphere 8.5 works with Java EE 6 and Java SE 7.

So what does that mean as far as code development goes? Is Java EE just a set of additional enterprise libraries? Does Java EE 6 mean it uses Java 6 syntax? Can I use Java 7 syntax on an 8.5 server and still utilize the frameworks and webservices provided by Java EE 6?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

Java EE is actually a set of specifications of various technologies. Each spec typically has an API (eg: javax.servlet.*, javax.ejb.* etc which is implemented by various vendors (eg: IBM websphere, JBoss, Weblogic etc). The idea is you only learn and write your code once, but you can use your code (with some adjustment) and your knowledge on various vendor implementation.

When you compile your war you typically have to include (for compilation purpose only -- not necessarily packaged) java ee api component of a particular version on your classpath (eg: java-servlet-2.5). The API component often has dependency to particular version of Java SE (eg: if the API / vendor implementation uses generics, it requires Java SE 5 or higher)

Java EE is required to be backward compatible, hence if you compile and package your war against Java EE 6 API, it will run on Java EE 7 container.

You don't necessarily have to use Java SE 7 API to run your code on Java EE 7, you can always compile your war against older version of Java EE API (hence older Java SE). New features will only available if you compile against latest version of the API.

share|improve this answer

Java EE specifications do target a specific Java SE release. For example, JSR 316 says: Java EE 6 is the Enterprise Edition of version 6 of the Java platform, and thus will be built on Java SE 6. Individual specs may still choose to be compatible with lower versions of Java SE, but never a higher version. Whether a Java EE implementation actually runs on a higher Java SE version that it was specced for depends on the implementation.

by @Arjan Tijms

share|improve this answer
    
So if I were to deploy to WebSphere 8.5, which of the following scenario be correct? a) I have to use Java 6 compliant code in my entire application to match the JEE6 spec? b) Fictitious example, using Java 7 version of a LIST class and webservices with Java 6 implementation somewhere in the application architecture? –  user2097723 Feb 22 '13 at 2:28
    
U can use Java 7 which is compatible with JavaEE6 –  knowbody Feb 22 '13 at 11:23

So what does that mean as far as code development goes?

It means, that you should know Java SE to create apps with the Java EE standard. Java EE is based upon Java SE.

Java SE 7 tutorial
Java EE 6 tutorial

Is Java EE just a set of additional enterprise libraries?

Well, simplifying many things... Yes.

Does Java EE 6 mean it uses Java 6 syntax? Can I use Java 7 syntax on an 8.5 server and still utilize the frameworks and webservices provided by Java EE 6?

You can use Java SE 7 syntax in Java EE 6 apps. But you can use Java SE 6 syntax too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.