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What I want: I want the list q to come up just three times. When it comes up, you are prompted to select one of the list items. Each time an example is selected, I want it to disappear and be unable to be selected again- I don't even want the option for selecting it to display. So, when example 1 is selected, it then displays the list with examples 2 and 3 available. Then, say example 3 is selected next- the list should display with only example 2 available after that. Instead, it displays with both 1 and 2 available, even though 1 was deleted previously.

So the problem is that the item is not permanently removed from the list upon deletion, and it comes back during the next print, which I don't want.

for x in range(0,3):
    q = ['example 1', 'example 2', 'example 3']
    select = raw_input("> ")
    if select == "1":
        del q[0]
        print q
    if select == "2":
        del q[1]
        print q
    if select == "3":
        del q[2]
        print q

It seems like there's a lot of questions about deleting things from lists in Python, but I've been looking for an answer for days and haven't found anything to work yet for my particular situation. Sorry in advance for any stupidity, I've been learning programming for only a month now.

share|improve this question
    
format your code. –  myusuf3 Feb 22 '13 at 3:01
3  
I dont know python but I think you should initlaize the list outside the for loop. –  smk Feb 22 '13 at 3:02
1  
your indices will be wrong after the first run through the loop; if i pick example 1 the first time, then example 2 will now be in q[0], etc. –  Eevee Feb 22 '13 at 3:06

3 Answers 3

Reason why your current code behaves that way is because of list 'q' gets initialized everytime. Then your way of deleting the list is also wrong.

Your copy/delete semantics refer to the deep-copy concepts in Python, which don't apply here.

You want to use dictionary type in Python.

def Foo():
    q = {1:'example 1', 2:'example 2', 3:'example 3'};
    for x in range(0,3):
        select = raw_input("> ")
        if select == "1":
            del q[1]
            print q
        if select == "2":
            del q[2]
            print q
        if select == "3":
            del q[3]
            print q

and more succinctly

def foo():
    q = {1:'example 1', 2:'example 2', 3:'example 3'};
    for x in range(0,3):
        select = raw_input("> ")
        del q[int(select)]
        print q
share|improve this answer
1  
Small comment - please don't capitalize function names in Python. That's for classes. –  frb Feb 22 '13 at 3:10
    
Sure - point taken –  Arcturus Feb 22 '13 at 3:12
    
Thank you so much! –  user2097828 Feb 22 '13 at 3:12
    
Also if you have a lot of select options it will look way cleaner to do another for loop to loop through those if statements. –  Daan Lubbers Feb 22 '13 at 3:15

Try this:

def menu():
    q = {1: 'example 1', 2: 'example 2', 3: 'example 3'}
    for _ in range(3):
        print '\n'.join('{} - {}'.format(*item) for item in sorted(q.items()))
        try:
            print q.pop(int(raw_input('> ')), "That's not a valid option")
        except ValueError:
            print "That's not a valid option"
    print "No more menu options left!"
share|improve this answer

Is there a reason you're using del here? This seems like too small a case to be worried about explicitly deleting objects. You just need to remove them from the list:

q = ['example 1', 'example 2', 'example 3']
while len(q)>0:
    try:
        select = int(raw_input("> "))
        print q.pop(select-1)
    except (ValueError, IndexError):
        print 'please enter an integer between 1 and 3'
share|improve this answer

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