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I am new to django so I may be going about this the wrong way (pretty sure I am).

Trying to get a webpage to display data from a postgresql DB in a table showing a status for a list of servers.

This is part of the template

<div class"row"=""><div class="span3" style="background-color:lightyellow; margin-left:20px">
<table class="table table-bordered table-condensed">
        <thead>
          <tr>
            <th>Server</th>
            <th>Status</th>
          </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody>
        {{ res }}
        </tbody>
      </table>
</div></div>

In my view I have this,

message = []
for res in data:
    message.append("          <tr>")
    message.append("            <td>" + str(res).split("'")[1] + "</td>")
    if str(res).split("'")[3] == 'No':
        message.append("            <td><FONT COLOR=\"008200\">Available</FONT> </td>")
    else:
        message.append("            <td><FONT COLOR=\"FF0000\">Down</FONT> </td>")
    message.append("          </tr>")

return render_to_response('health.html', {'res':message}, context_instance=RequestContext(request))

If I print that instead of doing the append I get the resulting HTML I would expect.

As it currently is, I don't get anything displayed on the webpage in that table.

I don't expect it to render the list necessarily, but would have thought something should have showed up in the table even if it was incorrect format.

Should this HTML processing be done in the template and not the view?

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I would move the presentation logic from the view to the template. But if you want to show html you can use the "safe" filter in the template {{res|safe}} –  JoseP Feb 22 '13 at 4:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, it is usually best to do all HTML processing in the template. This way you can separate your database access logic from your display logic and thereby reduce coupling. It also means you can easily re use template.

So you should use the view function to get the appropriate objects and pass them to the template as variables.

Still, you are sort of on the right track. In order for your {{res}} variable to display properly I think you will need to change the template to.

<tbody>
    {% for message in res %}
    {{ message }}
    {% endfor %}
</tbody>

This should iterate over the elements in the res variable which you passed to the template.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried adding that but still don't get anything to display. –  somethingelse Feb 22 '13 at 3:53
    
Restarting Apache got it to display the html txt. Will keep messing with it Thanks for the help. –  somethingelse Feb 22 '13 at 4:04
    
It did, Do you know why it is only printing out the txt vs rendering it? If I paste the output into the template it displays. –  somethingelse Feb 22 '13 at 4:22
    
Try looking into the mark_safe() funcion. docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/utils/… This function marks string as safe HTML output. But it might be an idea to instead see if you can build all the HTML into the template. Good luck! –  Ze'ev G Feb 22 '13 at 4:32
    
{{ message|safe }} fixed this. Thanks for the help. –  somethingelse Feb 22 '13 at 4:32

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