Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just want to somehow calculate the sum of the chars in the array by changing them into variables (c = 2, d = 3), in this case it should be 12 ie: (c + c + d + c + d) = (2 + 2 + 3 + 2 + 3). How can I do this? I need something to add to this code.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;

int main()
{
    char s[5] = {'c', 'c', 'd', 'c', 'd'};

    int j = sizeof(s) / sizeof(s[0]);
    int k = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i > j; i++)
        k += s[i];                 // end result should be 12

}
share|improve this question
1  
@JimHurley: That doesn't seem related. –  Jesse Good Feb 22 '13 at 3:55
    
By the way i will never be greater than j in the loop condition. –  chris Feb 22 '13 at 4:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well to calculate 12 without doing any conversions, (your program looks liek it doesn't need them), just use simple if statements:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;

int main()
{
    char s[5] = {'c', 'c', 'd', 'c', 'd'};

    int j = sizeof(s) / sizeof(s[0]);
    int k = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < j; i++){
        if(s[i]== 'c'){
            k += 2 ;                 // Check if the char is c and add accordingly
        }
        if(s[i]== 'd'){
            k += 3 ;                 // Check if the char is d and add accordingly
        }
    }
    cout << k;
}

You'll get 12 as your output.

Here's a link to the live program: http://ideone.com/Y79WFg

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this is just what I needed –  Foxic Feb 22 '13 at 3:55

You simply have to transform your char into int type, for exemple with function charToInt:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;

int charToInt(char c){
swith (c){
case '1' return 1;
case '2' return 2;
case '3' return 3;
case '4' return 4;
case '5' return 5;
case '6' return 6;
case '7' return 7;
case '8' return 8;
case '9' return 9;
default return 0;
}
}

int main()
{
    char s[5] = {'c', 'c', 'd', 'c', 'd'};

    int j = sizeof(s) / sizeof(s[0]);
    int k = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i > j; i++)
        k += charToInt(s[i]);                 // end result should be 12
cout<<k<<endl;
}
share|improve this answer

The simplest way is to change one line:

k += s[i]-97;
share|improve this answer
/* It should be noted that no ethically-trained software engineer would ever
   consent to write a DestroyBaghdad procedure. 
   Basic professional ethics would instead require him to write a DestroyCity 
   procedure, to which Baghdad could be given as a parameter.   
                 -- Nathaniel S. Borenstein, computer scientist*/
const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;

int getOrdinal(char c)
{
   switch(c){
    case 'c': return c;
    case 'd': return d;
    default: return 0;
   }
}
int main()
{
    char s[5] = {'c', 'c', 'd', 'c', 'd'};

    int j = sizeof(s) / sizeof(s[0]);
    int k = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < j; i++)
        k += getOrdinal(s[i]);                 // end result should be 12
    cout << k; /*now prints 12*/
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

If I am only understanding you question correctly (which I am probably not)... First, you are trying to reference a variable by a string...

"char s[5] = {'c', 'c', 'd', 'c', 'd'};"

That is impossible, the compiler does not keep variable names.

Try the following:

const int c = 2;
const int d = 3;

int main() {

    const int s[5] = {c, c, d, c, d};

    for (int i = 0 i < (sizeof(s)/sizeof(s[0] ++i)
        k += s[i];                 // end result should be 12

}

Also if you are trying to make the variables match with the letters of the alphabet... Do this:

#include <iostream>

int main() {

    char *String = "Hello World";

    for (char Pos = 0; Pos < sizeof(String)/sizeof(String[0]) ++Pos)
        cout << String[Pos]-'a'; // Outputs the char values combined (a-0, b-1, c-2 etc)

}
share|improve this answer
    
** Modified to be slightly more readable :) –  Mitch Feb 22 '13 at 4:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.