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Inside a Perl script, I want to run a Java program that takes in 2 inputs, which will be passed by the command line.

So I do:

if (scalar @ARGV == 2)
{ print `java myProg $ARGV[0] $ARGV[1]`; } 
elsif (scalar @ARGV == 1) 
{ print `java myProg $ARGV[0]`; }

I works if I enter 2 args, but still hangs if I enter only 1 arg

How should I correct it?

BTW, the Java program works.


I changed my Perl script to:

print scalar @ARGV;
print `$ARGV[0]`;
print `$ARGV[1]`;

And if I run 'perl myPerl.pl abc def' in command line, it only prints 2. And not my two inputs. WHY!?

share|improve this question
    
Does java myProg var1 var2 work from the command line? –  Chris Lutz Oct 1 '09 at 2:48
1  
Also, give us some realistic examples of input for var1 and var2 so we can help you better. –  Chris Lutz Oct 1 '09 at 2:49
6  
Don't put "URGENT" in your question. You can be assured that someone will look at the question and answer it quickly (the majority of questions get answers within hours, and some even within minutes). –  bobbymcr Oct 1 '09 at 2:49
    
A) This isn't a syntax problem. B) This isn't urgent –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 2:49
1  
Does your Java program take input from the command line arguments (the String[] args in your main method) or does it expect input from the console (System.in) ? –  mob Oct 1 '09 at 3:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The second code sample is heading off the rails, but the first code sample looks correct, more-or-less. Let's have a look at the Java code, your environment, or anything else that can help us figure out why

{ print `java myProg $ARGV[0] $ARGV[1]`; }

works and

{ print `java myProg $ARGV[0]`; }

doesn't.

share|improve this answer
    
"off the rails". I love it, I'm going to have to use that tomorrow. –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 4:50

To answer your latest question:

print scalar @ARGV;
print `$ARGV[0]`;
print `$ARGV[1]`;

The above code doesn't print the data you expect because you are using backticks with some random input data. Perl is trying to execute the shell commands "abc" and "def" (as per your example) and captures the output of running those commands, of which there isn't any. Try printing the values directly:

print scalar @ARGV;
print $ARGV[0], "\n";
print $ARGV[1], "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Let's hope he really used "abc" and "def". –  innaM Oct 1 '09 at 6:09

The java program is hanging. Try it straight from the command line.

To check if there are enough args you can do:

 die "needs 2 args" unless (scalar @ARGV == 2);

Try this code to prove it is the java:

if (scalar @ARGV == 2)
{ 
    print `cat myProg $ARGV[0] $ARGV[1]`; 
} 
elsif (scalar @ARGV==1) 
{ 
    print `cat myProg $ARGV[0]`; 
}

If all you want to do is print the arguments:

if (scalar @ARGV == 2)
{ 
    print "arguments = [$ARGV[0]] [$ARGV[1]]\n"; 
} 
elsif (scalar @ARGV==1) 
{ 
    print "arguments = [$ARGV[0]]\n"; 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Can shorten to unless @ARGV == 2; - scalar() isn't necessary in scalar context. –  Chris Lutz Oct 1 '09 at 2:52
1  
No reason to shorten things. Perl is already hard enough to understand. –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 2:52
1  
I don't see how it's any easier to understand. A curious person is still going to ask what scalar() does, and you're still going to have to explain scalar/list context to them. –  Chris Lutz Oct 1 '09 at 2:54
    
I have: if (scalar @ARGV == 2){ print java myProg $ARGV[0] $ARGV[1]; } elsif (scalar @ARGV==1) { print java myProg $ARGV[0]; } I works if i enter 2 args, but still hangs if i enter only 1 arg. –  Saobi Oct 1 '09 at 2:55
    
I'm telling you. THE JAVA PROGRAM IS HANGING! –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 2:56

Try this:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $BASE_COMMAND = 'java MyProgram';

die "Illegal argument count - must have one or two arguments."
    unless @ARGV == 1 or @ARGV == 2;

# Arrays interpolate into space separated strings (unless you change $" - see perlvar)
my $command = "$BASE_COMMAND @ARGV";

print "Running '$command'\n";
print `$command`;
share|improve this answer

Use $#ARGV to find the index of the last array element of @ARGV. Add 1 to that and you can get the arg count.

my $argCount = $#ARGV + 1;
if ($argCount == 1)
{
    die "Please enter 2 arguments!\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
what if they enter 0 args? –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 2:53
    
@tster: Then $#ARGV should be undef. –  Powerlord Oct 1 '09 at 3:11
    
Of course it wouldn't. $#ARGV would be -1. –  tster Oct 1 '09 at 3:15
    
That was just a sample showing how to use $#array; it is not meant to be the final production code to check the arguments. –  bobbymcr Oct 1 '09 at 3:20
1  
Just evaluate @ARGV in scalar context. No need to mess around with $#ARGV. my $argCount = @ARGV; –  daotoad Oct 1 '09 at 5:52

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