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I have a csv file which isn't coming in correctly with pandas.read_csv when I filter the columns with usecols and use multiple indexes.

import pandas as pd
csv = r"""dummy,date,loc,x
bar,20090101,a,1
bar,20090102,a,3
bar,20090103,a,5
bar,20090101,b,1
bar,20090102,b,3
bar,20090103,b,5"""
f = open('foo.csv', 'w')
f.write(csv)
f.close()

df1 = pd.read_csv('foo.csv', 
        index_col=["date", "loc"], 
        usecols=["dummy", "date", "loc", "x"],
        parse_dates=["date"],
        header=0,
        names=["dummy", "date", "loc", "x"])
print df1

# Ignore the dummy columns
df2 = pd.read_csv('foo.csv', 
        index_col=["date", "loc"], 
        usecols=["date", "loc", "x"], # <----------- Changed
        parse_dates=["date"],
        header=0,
        names=["dummy", "date", "loc", "x"])
print df2

I expect that df1 and df2 should be the same except for the missing dummy column, but the columns come in mislabeled. Also the date is getting parsed as a date.

In [118]: %run test.py
               dummy  x
date       loc
2009-01-01 a     bar  1
2009-01-02 a     bar  3
2009-01-03 a     bar  5
2009-01-01 b     bar  1
2009-01-02 b     bar  3
2009-01-03 b     bar  5
              date
date loc
a    1    20090101
     3    20090102
     5    20090103
b    1    20090101
     3    20090102
     5    20090103

Using column numbers instead of names give me the same problem. I can workaround the issue by dropping the dummy column after the read_csv step, but I'm trying to understand what is going wrong. I'm using pandas 0.10.1.

edit: fixed bad header usage.

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1  
Something else, your usage of the header and names keywords is not correct (that's why the first row is missing in your example. header expects an int (default 0) as the row with the header. Because you give 'True' which is interpreted as 1, the second row (first data row) is used as the header and is missing. However the column names are correct because you overwrite it with the names argument. But you can both leave them and the first row is used for the column names by default. However, it does not solve your initial question. –  joris Feb 22 '13 at 8:47
    
This looks like a usecols bug. Possibly related to bug 2654? –  abudis Feb 22 '13 at 11:37
    
bug is still there without names and header arguments, good find. –  Andy Hayden Feb 22 '13 at 12:20
    
@andy I'll poke at it a little more and submit it to the pandas bugs. I appreciate the sanity check. –  chip Feb 22 '13 at 17:37

3 Answers 3

This code achieves what you want --- also its weird and certainly buggy:

I observed that it works when:

a) you specify the index_col rel. to the number of columns you really use -- so its three columns in this example, not four (you drop dummy and start counting from then onwards)

b) same for parse_dates

c) not so for usecols ;) for obvious reasons

d) here I adapted the names to mirror this behaviour

import pandas as pd
from StringIO import StringIO

csv = """dummy,date,loc,x
bar,20090101,a,1
bar,20090102,a,3
bar,20090103,a,5
bar,20090101,b,1
bar,20090102,b,3
bar,20090103,b,5
"""

df = pd.read_csv(StringIO(csv),
        index_col=[0,1],
        usecols=[1,2,3], 
        parse_dates=[0],
        header=0,
        names=["date", "loc", "", "x"])

print df

which prints

                x
date       loc   
2009-01-01 a    1
2009-01-02 a    3
2009-01-03 a    5
2009-01-01 b    1
2009-01-02 b    3
2009-01-03 b    5
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1  
Thanks. I never figured out the right combination of re-arranging the names and numbers based on usecols so the data came in correct. –  chip Feb 22 '13 at 23:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your csv file contains extra data, columns can be deleted from the DataFrame after import.

import pandas as pd
from StringIO import StringIO

csv = r"""dummy,date,loc,x
bar,20090101,a,1
bar,20090102,a,3
bar,20090103,a,5
bar,20090101,b,1
bar,20090102,b,3
bar,20090103,b,5"""

df = pd.read_csv(StringIO(csv),
        index_col=["date", "loc"], 
        usecols=["dummy", "date", "loc", "x"],
        parse_dates=["date"],
        header=0,
        names=["dummy", "date", "loc", "x"])
del df['dummy']

Which gives us:

                x
date       loc
2009-01-01 a    1
2009-01-02 a    3
2009-01-03 a    5
2009-01-01 b    1
2009-01-02 b    3
2009-01-03 b    5
share|improve this answer

import csv first and use csv.DictReader its easy to process...

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This may be easier, but it's also massively slower. When you're working on large data-sets (I'm currently working with a single 13 GB CSV file myself), not having to wait hours for the file to load becomes much more important. –  Fake Name Dec 18 '13 at 2:32

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